Here is your latest issue of AgFax Weed Solutions, sponsored by Nufarm's Midwestern and Southern field teams.
 

Web Editor: Ernst Undesser
IN THIS ISSUE...
 
Editor's Picks
  • Dealing With Resistant Weeds – 13 Tips For 2018
  • Genetic Weed Control? The Next Frontier In Fighting Resistance?
  • Weather And Spraying: Pay Attention, Pay Attention, Pay Attention
  • Palmer Pigweed: Deeper Grasp Of Its Shortcut To Resistance
  • Weed Control Demands More Than Just Cutting Edge Sprayers
  • From Australia: Judging Inversions And Drift, Down Under 
Focus On The Corn Belt 
  • Ohio Soybeans: First, Figure Out Marestail Control
  • Midwest Soybeans: Ragweed's Greatest Effects on Yields – All That Shade
  • Nebraska Soybeans: Pre-Emergence Residuals Are Unavoidable
  • Indiana: Pay Me Now Or Pay Me Later - Managing Weeds For The Future
  • Ohio: Dicamba – Pay Attention to Nozzle Selection to Meet Label Requirements
  • Pennsylvania: Burcumber Management In Corn, Soy Requires Finesse
  • Illinois: 4 Suggestions For Achieving Success With Dicamba In 2018 
Focus On The South
  • North Carolina Cotton: Burndown Time Is Upon Us
  • Texas: Drones Help Researchers ‘Read the Weeds'
  • Tennessee: Managing Late-Emerging Horseweed
  • Georgia: Dicamba, 2-4D - Any Drift Effects On Pecan Trees?
  • Tennessee Corn: Weather Makes For Challenging Burndown This Year
  • Texas Cotton: Success With Auxin-Based Tech Hinges On Timing
  • Tennessee: Xtend Soybeans – Palmer Pigweed Strategies
  • Georgia: 4 Weed Management Questions Going Into 2018 Crops
 
EDITOR'S PICKS
 
Consultants in the Midwest and Midsouth give a baker's dozen list of ideas, tactics and approaches they use to minimize the effect of weeds that have slipped past most chemical options.
  
 
"Researchers are pushing to develop a new type of weed control system – known as genetic control – to target waterhemp and Palmer pigweed. The approach, if successful, would trick plants into producing an over-abundance of male offspring."
 
 
Inversion has gotten some of the blame for dicamba damage last year. "I have spent almost 30 years training applicators, and this is the first year that the message about inversion finally got attention."
  
 
How's this for scary? The glyphosate target gene, along with other genes, actually escape from the chromosomes and formed a separate, self-replicating circular DNA structure.
 
 
Training is available and it can make a quantitative difference in herbicide performance. It you drop $250K on a new sprayer, why not learn how to strain full value out of the investment.
 

 
U.S. farmers and applicators aren't the only people in the world taking crash courses in inversion layers and how they relate to unintended herbicide movement. Australia's ag community, likewise, has immersed itself in theories behind drift, volatization and crop injury avoidance. Here's a video from Mary O'Brien, who works as a private consultant conducting spray application and drift management workshops around Australia. A followup video compares movement after the inversion breaks later in the morning.
  
 
FOCUS ON THE CORN BELT
  
"One ragweed plant every 1.6 feet of soybean row decreased soybean yield by 76% in 2015, and by 40% in 2016. And soybean yield was reduced by 95% in 2015 and 80% in 2016 when common ragweed plants were grown only three inches apart in the soybean row."
 
  
Here's why: "Post-emergence herbicide options for weed control in soybeans are limited, particularly where glyphosate-resistant weeds are a problem. Six weed species in Nebraska have now been confirmed resistant
 to glyphosate and their populations are widespread. 
  
 
"Without any truly novel herbicides coming to market in the near future, we must adopt better weed management strategies as our current methods will lead us further down the path of weeds with multiple herbicide resistance, ineffective weed control, and significantly greater costs for weed management that diminishes our sustainability.
 
From our sponsor...
   
Panther Pro, the first three-way liquid flumioxazin premix, helps control tough weeds in your soybeans with excellent residual activity, resistance management and liquid convenience.
 
Hear what soybean growers in North Dakota, South Dakota and Pennsylvania had to say about Panther Pro after on-farm trails with the pre-emergent herbicide in 2017.
 
 
Just in case you missed the memo -- you're violating the label by spraying with any other type or size of nozzle. The question may be: can you still find the right nozzles?
  
 
No-till goes a long way toward pushing this weed into a quick, uniform flush. That, in turn, improves herbicide performance. Tillage works against all that.
 
 
At this point, it's not just a matter of killing weeds but perhaps whether the technology makes it into 2019 and beyond.
 
 
FOCUS ON THE SOUTH
 
March weather threw delays into burndown timing in cotton. By the time you read this, the window should be wide open. Here are things to remember about temperatures, mixtures and how to handle burndown in different cultural situations.

 
“We need this technology to make that identification sooner than the naked eye can...Putting this information into the hands of a consultant will be more cost-effective, as they can fly multiple fields in a short time."
 
    
“So are we out of the woods with respect to horseweed being a problem? If last spring is any indication, the answer would be NO! We had a huge late spring germination of horseweed in April and May of 2017." How will 2018 shape up?

 
"The biggest concerns are glyphosate-resistant ryegrass and, in a couple counties, glyphosate-resistant Johnsongrass. If ryegrass is not controlled prior to corn emergence there are no good herbicide control options.”
 
 
This really comes down to best management practices, plus attention to preemergent programs and residual approaches. Xtend might give you a head start but it's back to basics as the season progresses.
 
 
Recent inquiries about resistant ryegrass in peanuts, nozzle selection for soil-applied residuals and new corn materials.
  

From our sponsor...

 

Directly Contact Nufarm's Field Staff:
Troublesome Weeds? No Trouble At All.

Ross Huneycutt

Ross 
Huneycutt

SC, NC, VA

WVA, MD 
919-244-4098

Thomas McDaniel

Thomas 
McDaniel

KS, CO
970-227-1384

Jared
Uhlman

IA, NE, MO
515-371-2173

 

Terry
Schlieve

MT, WY, Western ND, Western SD

701-318-6558

J.W. Champion

J.W. 
Champion

IL, WI
708-203-6406

Brent
Sigurdson

MN,

Eastern SD

Eastern ND
218-791-3049

Clark

Boyd

770-365-0509

AL and GA

 

Reggie 
Young

972-259-0462

Southwest

craig noll

Craig 
Noll

FL
239-549-2494

Reed

Parker

Southwest

318-847-2524

Bethany

Barnes

Northeast

252-885-2536

Nichole Wilson

East Corn Belt

419-689-3176

 

Ask us about the C.A.T.S. (CombAtting Troublesome Species) solutions for your troublesome weeds.

nufarm

 

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