Weekly Cotton Market Review – USDA

    Cotton harvest near cotton gin with modules lined up in the gin yard. ©Debra L Ferguson

    Spot quotations averaged 255 points higher than the previous week, according to the USDA, Agricultural Marketing Service’s Cotton and Tobacco Program. Quotations for the base quality of cotton (color 41, leaf 4, staple 34, mike 35-36 and 43-49, strength 27.0-28.9, and uniformity 81.0-81.9) in the seven designated markets averaged 59.28 cents per pound for the week ending Thursday, August 6, 2020.

    The weekly average was up from 56.73 last week and from 53.47 cents reported the corresponding period a year ago. Daily average quotations ranged from a low of 58.01 cents Friday, July 31 to a season high of 59.77 cents Thursday, August 6.

    Spot transactions reported in the Daily Spot Cotton Quotations for the week ended August 6 totaled 65,659 bales. This compares to 17,733 reported last week and 2,872 spot transactions reported the corresponding week a year ago.

    Total spot transactions for the 2019-2020 marketing year were 1,620,966 bales compared to 1,278,960 bales at the end of the 2018-2019 marketing year. The ICE Oct settlement price ended the week at 64.41 cents, compared to 62.82 cents last week.

    USDA ANNOUNCES SPECIAL IMPORT QUOTA #16 FOR UPLAND COTTON August 6, 2020

    The Department of Agriculture’s Commodity Credit Corporation announced a special import quota for upland cotton that permits importation of a quantity of upland cotton equal to one week’s domestic mill use. The quota will be established on August 13, 2020, allowing importation of 1,809,441 kilograms (8,311 bales of 480-lbs) of upland cotton.

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    Quota number 16 will be established as of August 13, 2020 and will apply to upland cotton purchased not later than November 10, 2020 and entered into the U.S. not later than February 8, 2021. The quota is equivalent to one week’s consumption of cotton by domestic mills at the seasonally-adjusted average rate for the period April 2020 through June 2020, the most recent three months for which data are available. Future quotas, in addition to the quantity announced, will be established if price conditions warrant.

    Southeastern Markets Regional Summary

    Spot cotton trading was slow. Supplies and producer offerings were moderate. Demand was light. Average local spot prices were higher. Trading of CCC-loan equities was moderate. No forward contracting was reported. The COVID-19 Pandemic continues to negatively affect cotton demand and disrupt supply chains. Mostly cloudy to sunny conditions prevailed across the lower southeastern region during the period.

    Daytime high temperatures were in the upper 80s to low 90s. Localized thunderstorms brought from trace amounts to around one inch of weekly accumulated precipitation to portions of central Alabama and areas throughout Georgia. Hurricane Isaias brought beneficial moisture to coastal Georgia. The crop made good progress. In areas that received rainfall, producers welcomed the moisture that helped alleviate hot, dry conditions and relieved heat-stressed plants. Producers maintained full irrigation schedules.

    In Georgia, fruit shedding was observed in dryland fields that have missed significant rainfall in recent weeks. Whiteflies were present in southwest Georgia, southeast Alabama, and the Florida Panhandle, and populations were reported as expanding beyond historical ranges in a few areas. Some later planted fields with younger plants required multiple treatments for the pests. Hot and dry conditions allowed spider mites to flair in some areas. Stink bugs, plant bugs, and escaped bollworms were also present at treatable levels in several fields.

    According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service’s (NASS) Crop Progress report released August 3, cotton squaring neared completion and boll-setting reached 76 percent completed in Georgia and 73 percent completed in Alabama.

    Hurricane Isaias made landfall near Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina on the evening of Monday, August 3 and gained momentum as it tracked up the east coast. Strong winds blew around plants in fields along coastal areas of the Carolinas and Virginia impacted by the storm. Around one to four inches of beneficial moisture was also received in portions of the eastern Carolinas and Virginia. Producers welcomed the moisture, which relieved heat-stressed plants and helped to reduce spider mite populations. Stink bugs and plant bugs were present at treatable levels in some fields, but infestations were spotty.

    According to the NASS Crop Progress report released August 3, boll-setting had reached 64 percent completed in North Carolina, 59 in Virginia, and 48 percent completed in South Carolina.

    Textile Mill

    Domestic mill buyers booked a light volume of 2020-crop cotton, color 41, leaf 3, and staple 37 for November/December delivery. No additional inquiries or sales were reported. The undertone from mill buyers remained cautious as mills operated at reduced capacity due to lackluster demand associated with the COVID-19 Pandemic. Mills continued to produce personal protective equipment for frontline workers and military supplies in response to the COVID-19 disease.

    Demand through export channels was very light. Indonesian mill buyers purchased a light volume of color 31, leaf 3, and staple 36 for September shipment. Agents for mills in Vietnam inquired for a light volume of color 41, leaf 3, and staple 37 for nearby shipment; no sales were reported.

    Trading

    • A moderate volume mixed lot containing color mostly 52 and 53, leaf 3-5, staple 33-35, mike 43-50, strength 26-28, and uniformity 79-81 sold for around 42.00 cents per pound, FOB car/truck, Georgia terms (Rule 5, compression charges paid, 30 days free storage).
    • A heavy volume 2019 CCC-loan equity traded for 5.25 to 8.75 cents.

    South Central Markets Regional Summary

    North Delta

    Spot cotton trading was inactive. Supplies of available cotton and demand were light. Average local spot prices were higher. Trading of CCC-loan equities was slow. No forward contracting was reported. The COVID-19 Pandemic continues to negatively impact the overall global economy. The number of daily cases of the COVID-19 disease continues to grow, especially in the United States and Latin America.

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    A cooling trend characterized the weather pattern during the week. Daytime temperatures were mostly in the 80s and 90s. Overnight lows were in the mid-60s, which provided welcome relief from the intense heat of the previous few weeks. Producers were carefully monitoring fields for insect pests. Many fields were treated for infestations of plant bugs, bollworms, and spider mites. Weeds were under control in most places, but were a problem in some fields due to the lateness of the crop.

    Plant growth regulators were applied as necessary to control excessive vegetative growth. The crop made steady progress under good weather conditions; boll setting advanced rapidly in Tennessee. According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service’s (NASS) Crop Progress report released on August 3, cotton setting bolls had reached 95 percent in Arkansas, 28 in Missouri, and 67 percent in Tennessee.

    Crop development was near the 5-year average in Arkansas and Tennessee, but lagged at least 3 weeks behind in Missouri. However, local experts there reported that fields looked good and boll loads were heavy. NASS reported that the crop condition was mostly good-to-excellent in Arkansas, and fair-to-good in Missouri and Tennessee.

    South Delta

    Spot cotton trading was inactive. Supplies of available cotton and demand were light. Average local spot prices were higher. Trading of CCC-loan equities was slow. No forward contracting was reported. The COVID-19 Pandemic continues to negatively impact economic activity around the world. The number of daily cases continues to grow, especially in North and South America.

    Cooler weather prevailed during the week. Daytime temperatures dropped into the upper 80s to low 90s. Overnight lows were in the low 70s. A series of thundershowers brought around 2 inches of beneficial moisture to Mississippi and provided some relief form hot temperatures. The crop made excellent progress under good growing conditions. Local experts reported that more fields had reached cut-out, while many fields were still in bloom.

    Insect pressure from plant bugs and bollworms was heavy in parts of Mississippi and Louisiana; spider mites were a problem in drier areas. Fields were treated as necessary to control infestations. Boll shedding was reported in some places as a result of adverse weather conditions, but producers remained optimistic about good yields due to heavy fruiting. Many fields have received several applications of plant growth regulators to control excessive vegetative growth.

    According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service’s (NASS) Crop Progress report released on August 3, boll setting had reached 90 percent in Louisiana and 70 percent in Mississippi; Mississippi lagged about 1 week behind average for this time of the season. NASS reported that the crop condition was mostly good-to-excellent in Louisiana, and fair-to-good in Mississippi.

    Trading

    North Delta

    • A light volume of CCC-loan equities traded for 2.50 cents per pound.

    South Delta

    • A light volume of CCC-loan equities traded for 2.50 cents per pound.

    Southwestern Markets Regional Summary

    East Texas

    Spot cotton trading was slow. Supplies and producer offerings were moderate. Demand was light. Average local spot prices were higher. Producer interest in forward contracting was light. Trading of CCC-loan equities was active. Foreign inquiries were light. Interest was best from China, Indonesia, Pakistan, Taiwan, and Vietnam. The Loan Deficiency Payment remains in effect. The lack of demand and the COVID-19 Pandemic disrupted marketing infrastructure.

    The Rio Grande Valley is still assessing damages from Hurricane Hanna. Some of the hardest hit counties were Cameron, Hidalgo, and Willacy. Many fields had been defoliated and bolls were open before Hanna, which played a big part in the initial assessment of a 90 to 100 percent loss on about 125,000 acres. In areas not as severely hit from Hanna, growers were able to resume harvesting and defoliating, but the occurrence of seed sprout is a concern. In the Coastal Bend and Upper Coast, there is some concern over quality and yield loss, but overall potential yields are expected to be well above average.

    In Kansas, both irrigated and dryland crops progressed well. Temperatures were in the low-to-mid 80s. More heat units are needed to finish out the crop; higher temperatures in the nearby forecast have producers optimistic. Cotton crop conditions were fair to good according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service’s (NASS) Crop Progress report released August 3.

    In Oklahoma, temperatures were cooler in the upper 80s. A good rain is needed to progress the crop. Insect pressure was light. Producers were encouraged to scout for bollworms and other pest. Crop conditions were mostly good, according to NASS.

    West Texas

    Spot cotton trading was slow. Supplies and producer offerings were light. Demand was light. Average local spot prices were higher. Producer interest in forward contracting was light. Trading of CCC-loan equities was moderate. Foreign inquiries were light. Interest was best from China and Pakistan. The Loan Deficiency Payment remains in effect. The COVID-19 Pandemic restrictions continued to impact commodity markets.

    Daytime temperatures were in the low to upper 90s, with overnight lows ranging from the mid-60s to low 70s. Late in the period, temperatures rose into the triple digits adding stress to already droughty conditions. Scattered showers brought less than 1 inch of precipitation.

    Sources report an estimated loss of about 75 percent in dryland cotton for some areas, due to drought. The irrigated crop is progressing nicely, but a beneficial rain is needed to help finish out the crop and give overworked wells some relief. No insect pressure was reported.

    Trading

    East Texas

    • In Kansas, a light volume of 2019-crop mostly color 31 and 41, leaf 2 and 3, staple 36-37, mike 41-44, strength 29-31, and uniformity 80 and 81 sold for around 60.25 cents per pound, FOB car/truck (compression charges not paid).
    • In Oklahoma, a light volume of 2019-crop color 31 and 41, leaf 2 and 3, staple 37 and 38, mike 46-48, strength 29-31, and uniformity 78-82 sold for around 60.00 cents, same terms as above.
    • A light volume of mostly color 31 and 41, leaf 2 and 3, staple 31-35, mike 35-44, strength 27-32, uniformity 76-81, and 50 percent extraneous matter sold for around 51.00 cents, same terms as above.
    • A light volume of 2018-crop color 41-43, leaf 1-6, staple 32-38, mike averaging 47.3, strength averaging 28.2, and uniformity averaging 79.1 sold for around 42.00 cents, same terms as above.
    • A heavy volume of 2019-CCC-loan equities traded for 0.00 to 0.75 cents

    West Texas

    • A mixed lot of 2019-crop containing a light volume of mostly color 32 and better, leaf 2 and 3, staple 33, mike 41-50, strength 24-31, and uniformity 77-84 sold for around 49.25 cents per pound, FOB car/truck (compression charges not paid).
    • A light volume mixed lot containing color 21, 31, and 41, leaf 2-6, staple 32-37, mike 41-51, strength 26-33, uniformity 78-83, and 25 percent extraneous matter sold for around 52.50 cents, same terms as above.
    • A light volume of 2019-CCC-loan equities traded for 0.50 to 1.00 cents.

    Western Markets Regional Summary

    Desert Southwest (DSW)

    Spot cotton trading was slow. Supplies were moderate. Demand was light. Average local prices were higher. No forward contracting or domestic mill activity was reported. The Loan Deficiency Payment remained in effect. Trading of CCC-loan equities was moderate. Foreign mill inquiries were light for 2019-crop cotton. Inquiries for October to January shipments were moderate for new-crop. The COVID-19 Pandemic continued to adversely impact the U.S. economy and cotton demand.

    Heat units were building in Arizona and the crop made good progress with daytime temperature highs in the low to mid-100s. Overnight temperatures in the 70s gave stands a moment to rest and recover from heat stress. Irrigation was underway. Strong crop vigor was noted for stands in Wilcox, AZ with daytime temperatures in the mid-90s with an overnight reprieve in the high 60s. A storm moved across Safford, AZ that brought a light amount of hail damage to a few stands. Bolls were opening and harvest aids were applied in Yuma, AZ. Harvesting was expected to begin in 7 to 10 days.

    In Arizona, cotton setting bolls was at 95 percent, ahead of 80 last year, and 79 percent of the five-year average, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service’s (NASS) Crop Progress report released August 3.

    Stands in New Mexico advanced and benefited from rainfall. Cotton setting bolls in New Mexico was at 48 percent, ahead of 12 from the previous year, and 41 percent for the five-year average, according to NASS.

    Producers in El Paso, TX were encouraged as the crop advanced. Some hail was received and damage was under evaluation. Insect pressure was light and fields were irrigated.

    San Joaquin Valley (SJV)

    Spot cotton trading was inactive. Supplies and demand were light. Average local prices were higher. No forward contracting or domestic mill activity was reported. Trading of CCC-loan equities was inactive.

    Foreign mill inquiries were light. The Loan Deficiency Payment remained in effect. The COVID-19 Pandemic continued to impact markets. In the SJV, daytime high temperatures were in the upper 80s to low 100s, and overnight lows were in the upper 50s to mid-60s. Stands were blooming and some received final irrigation water. Insect pressure was light and below treatable levels.

    Producers monitored fields for weed escapes. The crop was rated good to excellent, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service’s Crop Progress report published on August 3. Boll setting was at 65 percent, near 63 last year, and the 66 percent five-year average.

    American Pima (AP)

    Spot cotton trading was inactive. Supplies were moderate. Demand was light. Average local prices were steady. No forward contracting or domestic mill activity was reported. Foreign mill inquiries were light. The Pima Competitive Payment remained at 7.00 cents. The COVID-19 Pandemic continues to negatively influence cotton demand and disrupt supply chains.

    In the San Joaquin Valley, producers were optimistic about the stands and some applied final irrigation water. Plants were blooming. The AP acres in Yuma, AZ approached harvest with daytime temperatures reaching 113 to 116 degrees. Bolls were popping open and harvest aids were applied. Stands had reached peak bloom Central Arizona. Insect monitoring was underway and some treatments were applied.

    Storms brought beneficial rainfall and hail in El Paso, TX. Damage was reported as mild and assessments were ongoing. The crop matured in New Mexico and benefited from recent intermittent rainfall. Producers in El Paso and New Mexico were expecting above average yields and optimism was high. Overall, the crop made excellent progress in the Far West.

    Trading

    Desert Southwest

    • A light volume of 2019-crop New Mexico cotton mostly color 31 and 41, leaf 3, staple 36 and 37, mike averaging 46.1, strength averaging 30.8, and uniformity averaging 80.1 sold for around 61.00 cents per pound, FOB car/truck (compression charges not paid).
    • Similar lots of New Mexico cotton mostly color 21 and 31, leaf 2 and 3, staple 34 to 37, mike 47-50, strength 28-31, and uniformity 78 and 81 traded for around 60.00 to 60.50 cents, same terms as above.
    • A heavy volume of 2019-CCC-loan equities traded for 4.75 to 7.50 cents.

    San Joaquin Valley

    • No trading activity was reported.

    American Pima

    • No trading activity was reported.



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