Nebraska Alfalfa: Don’t Take this Crop for Granted

Harvested alfalfa row. ©Debra L Ferguson

In the rush to get into corn and soybean fields this spring, don’t take your alfalfa for granted.

It is critical that alfalfa growers evaluate their fields in the next couple of weeks to make sure they don’t miss making some important decisions.

First is weed control. Last fall provided excellent weather conditions, both moisture and
temperature, to start a bumper crop of winter annual weeds like mustards, pennycress, and wild oats or downy brome.  If you want to prevent these weeds from damaging your first cutting, you must  act now to apply the right herbicides before your alfalfa develops much growth.

Next comes evaluating your alfalfa stand.  With all the alternative cropping and forage options  available to you, there is no good excuse for having low production from fields due to a thin stand of  alfalfa. If alfalfa stands in your fields have declined to the point where you should make additions like  oats for extra hay this year or orchardgrass and festulolium for more permanent help, these plantings  need to be done now, before your alfalfa gets too much of a head start and overwhelms later new  seedlings.

An inspection now can also help determine whether the field needs to be rotated to another crop and a whole new field of alfalfa planted.

Even a short delay in assessing your alfalfa stand could make it difficult to make important decisions for this year’s crop.


The Latest


Send press releases to Ernst@Agfax.com.

View All Events


Send press releases to Ernst@Agfax.com.

View All Events