Arkansas Field Reports: Insect Pressure on the Rise

Crop Progress and Condition for the Week Ending August 5, 2018.

Comments from Cooperative Extension Service County Agents

Olivia Foster, Carroll County
“Much needed rain fell in parts of the county. Other parts are still dangerously dry. Some lucky producers were able to get a second cutting of hay, but the yield and quality is down compared to a normal year. Producers are still selling off cattle due to a lack of stored forages and lack of pasture.”

Richard Klerk, Faulkner County
“Rice was heading, and rice stink bug scouting continued. Soybeans were being scouted for pod feeding worms, but only a few fields have been sprayed. Most of the corn irrigation has been terminated with just a few late fields still needing irrigation. Pastures and hay fields are showing stress from the drought and heat.”

Brent Griffin, Prairie County
“Scattered rainfall occurred in areas while irrigation continued where no precipitation occurred. Pod worm pressure continued to increase in soybeans. Early rice was being drained and corn was maturing rapidly. Hay fields and pastures continue to show signs of drought.”

Kevin Lawson, Perry County
“Soybean fields were being sprayed for corn earworms. Rice fields were heading. Rice stink bug numbers remain low. Pastures and hay fields are showing stress from the lack of rain.”

Mike Andrews, Randolph County
“All crops continued to be irrigated. Early corn is getting close to having irrigation terminated. Insect pressure remained low during the week with the exception of some rice fields which were treated for stink bugs. Forages continue to decline with lack of moisture. Hay production is still running behind on most farms.”

AgFax Weed Solutions


General Comments

According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service in Arkansas, there were 6.5 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending Sunday, August 5, 2018. Topsoil moisture supplies were 19 percent very short, 43 percent short, 35 percent adequate, and 3 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were 15 percent very short, 52 percent short, 31 percent adequate, and 2 percent surplus.

Low temperatures ranged from 60.4 degrees Fahrenheit at Calico Rock to 69.3 degrees Fahrenheit at Dequeen. Highs ranged from 81.0 degrees Fahrenheit at Hope to 95.0 degrees Fahrenheit at Corning. Moderate precipitation was received throughout the State, with the highest concentration occurring in the southwest part of the State with an average of 1.46 inches.


The Latest


Send press releases to Ernst@Agfax.com.

View All Events


Send press releases to Ernst@Agfax.com.

View All Events