Virginia Field Reports: Rains Keep Farmers Idle

Crop Progress and Condition for the Week Ending May 27, 2018.

REPORTER COMMENTS BY COUNTY – Comments are based on remarks made by extension agents, farmers, commodity specialists, and other knowledgeable individuals.

NORTHERN

ROCKINGHAM (Doug Horn)
Wet soil conditions prevented much field work. Heavy rains over the weekend caused some localized flooding. Grass growth has increased with the warm, wet weather.

LOUDOUN (Jim Hilleary)
Soil remains near saturated, minimizing opportunities for effective work using wheeled farm equipment or implements. Most all cool season grasses have begun dropping seeds. Orchardgrass and red clover have reached 24 – 36 inches. Warm season invasive grasses (Japanese Stiltgrass) has emerged and are visible. Additional rainfall expected this week.

WESTERN

BATH/HIGHLAND (John Benner)
Severe rain all week, slowing corn progress.

CENTRAL

AMELIA (Laura Siegle)
Though this week was far less rainy than last, some areas and field edges/corners are still saturated or have some standing water.

CAROLINE (Mike Broaddus)
After a long 10 day stretch of rain, producers are finally returning to the fields to plant soybeans and spray fungicides for winter wheat.

HANOVER (Laura Maxey-Nay)
Heavy rains are increasing small grain disease, decreasing the amount of soybean planted, and increasing the drowned commodities.

EASTERN

KING GEORGE (Mike Broaddus)
After a long 10 day stretch of rain, producers are finally returning to the fields to plant soybeans and spray fungicides for winter wheat.

ACCOMACK (Theresa Pittman)
Rainfall 2.11 inches in the last week.

CHARLES CITY (Scott Reiter)
Minimal field work was accomplished this week as growers waited for soil conditions to dry out some. Some activities that occurred late in the week were herbicide applications, sidedressing nitrogen to corn, planting soybeans, and hay cutting and baling.

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NEW KENT (Laura Maxey-Nay)
Heavy rains are increasing small grain disease, decreasing the amount of soybean planted, and increasing the drowned commodities.

GLOUCESTER/KING AND QUEEN/KING WILLIAM/MIDDLESEX (Tracy Porter)
Alfalfa bounced back from aphid infestation with application of pesticide. The impact on future corn and soybean yields due to the recent heavy rainfall is currently unknown. Impact should be less on corn, but early soybean yields may be more impacted from low 02 in root zone. Winter wheat and hay yields should be average to above average if the rains hold up long enough for farmers to get into the fields to cut it. Hay is now mature and will get tougher, it cannot be cut due to wet field conditions. Weedy conditions in pasture forage is still an issue.

SOUTHERN

LUNENBURG (Lindy Tucker)
The rains have continued. Lots of flooding in the eastern side of the county. Some bean plantings in low areas have been flooded and will have to be replanted. Tobacco and grass are growing. Much of the hay that wasn’t cut before the rains will suffer quality loss as it is too mature now. Temperatures have stayed high. Despite the rains over much of the county, I believe subsoil water is still low in places.

SOUTHEASTERN

BRUNSWICK (Cynthia Gregg)
Rain last week, flooding was an issue early in the county. Fields were flooded along with approximately 28 roads being impassable. One bridge was closed all last week. Corn fields have drowned spots. Several tobacco fields had some washes. Small grains lodged and some were cut for haylage this past week. Soybeans are coming up well, there have been a few washed out spots in a few fields.

PRINCE GEORGE/SURRY/SUSSEX (Scott Reiter)
Minimal field work was accomplished this week as growers waited for soil conditions to dry out some. Some activities that occurred late in the week were herbicide applications, sidedressing nitrogen to corn, planting soybeans, and hay cutting and baling.

GREENSVILLE (Sara Rutherford)
As fields with sandier soils dry out, planting has recommenced. Some vegetable crop loss due to excessive rain affecting young tomato seedlings and pea seeds damping off. Pastures are looking better with recent rainfall.

CHESAPEAKE CITY (Watson Lawrence Jr.)
Excessive rain continues to hamper planting of spring crops and hay cuttings.

General Comments

Days suitable for fieldwork were 3.6. Weather conditions continue to be wet, limiting fieldwork and crop progress due to water in the fields. Farming activities for the week included planting crops, applying fungicides, and making hay.


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