Texas Upper Coast: Bollworms Moving to Cotton as Grains Dry Down; Watch for Stink Bugs

I’d like to let everyone know that the comment periods for clothianidin and thiamethoxam’s preliminary pollinator assesment, and imidicloprid’s aquatic ecological assessment are currently open. The focus is mainly on foliar applied neonicotinoids and not seed treatments. Producers, your comments are valuable. If you’ve got time, use the following links and click “comment”.

Grain across the three counties is mostly drying down, and we are continuing to see bollworms moving over to cotton from corn and sorghum.

This week we’ve been seeing some bollworms in fields still, keeping with the pattern of high egg lay and some damage with few worms. If you’ve got more than 8-12 worms in 100 plants and 5% damaged bolls, consider treatment. Again, if you’re seeing high numbers of caterpillars older than two days, give me a call. I still have some diet cups to mail caterpillars to College Station for resistance testing.

There have been stink bugs occasionally across the area, once cotton gets to NAWF= 5 + 450 DD60s, stop sampling and treating. As cotton gets closer to cut out, the threshold for stink bugs can increase. Our cotton doesn’t keep blooming for 8 weeks as is mentioned on the chart, but for the final week of bloom, it would be wise to use either the 50 to 30% threshold.

Click Image to Enlarge

Click Image to Enlarge

Most of the later replanted cotton in Wharton county is close to peak bloom, while the rest in all three counties hovers from 6-8 nodes above white flower to nearly at cutout. The spotty showers we got over the past week hit Jackson and Matagorda county more than Wharton county. A few places in Matagorda county I heard got up to 7 inches of rain.

Spotted Lady Beetle in Cotton Bloom. Photo: Kate Harrell

I hope everyone has a good weekend and a happy 4th of July.


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