South Carolina: False Chinch Bugs – Treat ‘Em Or Leave ‘Em Alone?

False chinch bugs. Photo: University of Tennessee

Jacob Stokes, county agent covering Florence and Williamsburg Counties, reported seeing tons of what we determined to be false chinch bugs in early vegetative soybeans.

Very likely, not enough time elapsed between the burn-down application and planting. Put some time between those events to impede insects transitioning from weed to crop hosts.

Don’t give them a bridge. Control of these insects on young soybeans or cotton is often not needed, despite the alarming numbers of insects present, but they can hurt plants under very high numbers. The key is to determine how much stress plants are in from drought, herbicides, fertility, insects, etc. Then, figure out what you can address, if needed, and what you cannot.

Often, the best thing to get on these plants is water – either irrigation or rainfall – since they can be tough to kill with insecticides.

William Hardee, county agent covering Horry and Marion Counties, checked out a call for Japanese beetles on cotton. He reported that they seemed to be eating more pigweed than cotton. We have seen Japanese beetles in cotton before and determined that control of this defoliating insect is seldom needed.




The Latest


Send press releases to Ernst@Agfax.com.

View All Events


Send press releases to Ernst@Agfax.com.

View All Events