Here is our latest issue of AgFax Weed Solutions, sponsored by Nufarm's Midwestern and Southern field teams.
 
Web Editor: Ernst Undesser
IN THIS ISSUE...
 
Editor's Picks
  • Weeds And Water – 5 Things That Matter
  • Weed Seeds: 6 Ways Australians Keep Them Out Of The Bank – Video
  • Harrington Seed Destructor - U. of Illinois Will Showcase Aussie Rig At October Tour
  • Rotating Herbicides To Prevent Resistant Waterhemp? You're Shooting Yourself In The Foot, Study Shows
Midwestern Focus
  • Iowa: Palmer Pigweed – Osceola County Makes It An Even "50"
  • South Dakota: Palmer Pigweed - Now's the Time to Scout
  • Pennsylvania: Boosting Burndown With 2,4-D Makes Sense - But Study Those Intervals
  • Ohio: Palmer Pigweed – Late Season Scouting Tips
  • Minnesota: Mow Fenceline Weeds Now to Prevent Seed Production
  • Indiana: Start Controlling 2018's Marestail Now With Fall-Applied Herbicides
  • Minnesota: Target Weeds After Small Grain Harvest
Southern Focus
  • Alabama Peanuts: Late-Season Weed Problems – 4 Possible Options
  • Tennessee: Cover Crops - Next Spring's First Line Of Defense Against Resistant Weeds
  • Arkansas Rice: Stinkgrass - A New Tough Customer
 
EDITOR'S PICKS
 
Obviously, weeds compete for water, which may not be a big deal if you have plenty of water. But in drier parts of the country - or during droughts - yields can take a big hit, especially where they got an early headstart.
 
 
More than any other country, Australia has persistently focused on the idea of collecting weed seed at harvest and keeping them from making it into the soil’s seed bank. The developmental process in Australia has taken several forms – some relatively simple and cheap and others that require extra machinery. But all show some degree of success when it comes to keeping new weed seed out of the soil.
 
 
The Desctructor, a cage mill towed behind a combine, takes in the crop’s chaff and grinds it pretty much into dust. That chaff contains most of the weed seeds collected by the combine, so the percentage of viable seed left in the field drops dramatically.
 

Conventional wisdom seems to have been discounted. Resistance mutations occur too much for chemical rotation to matter. “That means using multiple herbicides, using a PRE and coming back with a POST. If you have escapes, getting out of your tractor and getting rid of them before they set seed."

 
MIDWEST/CORN BELT FOCUS
 
Palmer amaranth is now widely established across the state, so it’s likely new infestations will randomly appear in new fields at an increasing frequency. While pigweeds do not have inherent dispersal mechanisms, the abundant small seeds are easily transported by farming operations and wildlife. Every field in the state is at risk of being invaded.
 
  
Where to look for Palmer pigweed and how to tell the difference between it and its less-evil cousin, waterhemp.
 
 
Some labels are more specific than others when it comes to plant-back restrictions across a variety of crops. But the chemistry brings enough to the table in terms of weed and resistance management that it's worth looking for a fit.
 
Ohio: Palmer Pigweed – Late Season Scouting Tips
 
"Taking time to remove any Palmer and waterhemp plants from fields now will go a long way toward maintaining the profitability of farm operations...The dead giveaway for Palmer amaranth as we move into late summer is the long seedhead, and those on female seed-bearing plants are extremely rough to the touch."
 
 
Marestail is controlled effectively by many fall applied programs. Managing this weed with fall applied programs should be strongly considered in areas with known infestations of glyphosate-resistant populations...The addition of 2.4-D to key products will greatly increase control of glyphosate-resistant populations.
 
 
The most prominent weeds in stubble fields are often late-emerging weeds like waterhemp and other pigweed species that emerged after early season herbicide applications were made. Control escaped weeds now to prevent seed production and weed seed bank replenishment.
 
 

 

SOUTHERN FOCUS

 
Late weeds in peanuts put growers and crop advisors in a quandary. Pre-harvest intervals limit what you can do. Here are 4 possible approaches. 
 

Cover crops suppress weeds but can also lend an additive effect to the control of the PRE herbicide you actually put out in your cash crop. Both legume and grass cover crop species are dominant choices when considering a cover crop. However, some cash crops seem to thrive better in certain covers. In short, cover crops are cash-crop specific.
 

In evaluations, stinkgrass has been extremely difficult to control with rice herbicides...With the exception of Proviso herbicide, new rice herbicides now in the pipeline also failed to provide commercial post control.
 

From our sponsor...

 

Directly Contact Nufarm's Field Staff:
Troublesome Weeds? No Trouble At All.

Ross Huneycutt

Ross 
Huneycutt

SC, NC, VA

WVA, MD 
919-244-4098

Thomas McDaniel

Thomas 
McDaniel

KS, CO
970-227-1384

Jared
Uhlman

IA, NE, MO
515-371-2173

 

Terry
Schlieve

MT, WY, Western ND, Western SD

701-318-6558

J.W. Champion

J.W. 
Champion

IL, WI
708-203-6406

Brent
Sigurdson

MN,

Eastern SD

Eastern ND
218-791-3049

Clark

Boyd

770-365-0509

AL and GA

troy golden

Troy 
Golden

TX, OK, NM
817-739-4163

craig noll

Craig 
Noll

FL
239-549-2494

Reed

Parker

Southwest

318-847-2524

Bethany

Barnes

Northeast

252-885-2536

Nichole Wilson

East Corn Belt

419-689-3176

 

Ask us about the C.A.T.S. (CombAtting Troublesome Species) solutions for your troublesome weeds.

nufarm

 

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AgFax Weed Solutions is published by AgFax Media LLC. If you're receiving this newsletter from us, either a friend or business contact asked us to forward the report to you or you are a regular subscriber to one of our crop, pest and issue-related reportscovering states in the Corn Belt, South, Southwest and Far West.


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