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Tag "Missouri"

Missouri: Armyworms in Wheat, Pastures – Control Options

Missouri: Armyworms in Wheat, Pastures – Control Options

👤By Gregory Luce, University of Missouri 🕔May 23, 2017

Armyworm feeding has been reported in wheat in Central Missouri as well as some severe feeding in some grass pastures in Western and NW Missouri. Here are some facts for scouting and threshold information on this occasional pest to Missouri

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Rice: Weed Control Turns Complicated In Parts Of Midsouth – AgFax

Rice: Weed Control Turns Complicated In Parts Of Midsouth – AgFax

👤By Owen Taylor 🕔May 18, 2017

Tough decisions are being made or delayed about how to deal with weeds that have emerged in rice that already has been weakened by bad weather. While weeds and grass are emerging, nobody wants to hit rice with a treatment

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Missouri Corn: How Much Nitrogen Has Been Lost to Rain?

Missouri Corn: How Much Nitrogen Has Been Lost to Rain?

👤By Peter Scharf, University of Missouri 🕔May 18, 2017

The spring was going great. Corn was nearly planted across Missouri and much of the corn belt. It was a little dry, but not too bad. Then a couple of big weather systems dropped 5 to 15 inches of rain

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Arkansas Flooding: Replanting but Too Late for Many Rice Acres – DTN

Arkansas Flooding: Replanting but Too Late for Many Rice Acres – DTN

👤By Mary Kennedy, DTN Basis Analyst 🕔May 16, 2017

On May 2, flooding from heavy rains inundated farm fields, homes and businesses in Arkansas. The storms caught both livestock and row-crop farmers at a critical time, according to Randy Veach, president of the Arkansas Farm Bureau. “We have livestock

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Rice: Arkansas Flood Losses May Be Revised Upward – AgFax

Rice: Arkansas Flood Losses May Be Revised Upward – AgFax

👤By Owen Taylor 🕔May 12, 2017

More rice acres will likely be lost in Arkansas to this month’s flooding than initially thought. Markets taking note.

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Corn Belt: Rain Slowed Field Work but Forecast Looks Promising – DTN

Corn Belt: Rain Slowed Field Work but Forecast Looks Promising – DTN

👤By Emily Unglesbee, DTN Staff Reporter 🕔May 12, 2017

The Corn Belt is in watch-and-wait mode. Growers from Ohio, Illinois, Indiana and Missouri told DTN they were parking their planters and sprayers for a few days longer, after flooding and cold weather dominated the first half of the month.

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Midsouth Cotton: Big Planting Push Ahead Of Next Rain – AgFax

Midsouth Cotton: Big Planting Push Ahead Of Next Rain – AgFax

👤By Owen Taylor 🕔May 11, 2017

Cotton planting picked up on a wider basis after rain in cold weather shut down most activity.

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Rice: Rain, Flooding Dominate Decisions In Many Areas – Horizon Ag

Rice: Rain, Flooding Dominate Decisions In Many Areas – Horizon Ag

👤From Horizon Ag 🕔May 11, 2017

South Louisiana and Texas Once again, we are dealing with a flood in central and south Louisiana. It seems like over the past year we have dealt with this problem way too many times. All of this began on Sunday,

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Missouri Wheat: What to Do After Floods? What and See.

Missouri Wheat: What to Do After Floods? What and See.

👤By Duane Dailey, University of Missouri 🕔May 11, 2017

Wheat flooded before harvest brings questions from affected farmers. What do they do now? University of Missouri Extension field crops specialists said, “Wait and see.” During a weekly teleconference, field staff answered questions from farmers. Dirty or even mud-caked wheat

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Missouri Corn: Farmers Facing Replant Still Have Time to Stay with Intentions

Missouri Corn: Farmers Facing Replant Still Have Time to Stay with Intentions

👤By Linda Geist, University of Missouri 🕔May 11, 2017

Corn growers facing replanting decisions because of flooding and saturated soils have time to safely plant corn through the end of May and even into early June. That is the advice from University of Missouri Extension agronomy specialist Greg Luce.

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