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Tag "dicamba label restrictions"

Iowa Soybeans: New Dicamba Labels Issued

Iowa Soybeans: New Dicamba Labels Issued

👤By Kristine Schaefer, Iowa State University Extension Pesticide Safety Specialist 🕔Jan 12, 2018

In October 2017, the Environmental Protection Agency reclassified Engenia, FeXapan herbicide Plus VaporGrip Technology, and Xtendimax With VaporGrip Technology as Restricted Use products and added additional restrictions and requirements to their use. One of the additional requirements stated that anyone

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Dicamba: Kansas Applicators Must Have Training, License to Purchase

Dicamba: Kansas Applicators Must Have Training, License to Purchase

👤By Frannie Miller, Kansas State University 🕔Jan 10, 2018

Unintentional damage to millions of acres of crops from the herbicide dicamba last year prompted changes in regulations. Anyone planning to buy one of the new dicamba formulations in 2018 must have either a private applicator or category-specific commercial applicator

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Iowa: New Dicamba Labels Impact Application Timing

Iowa: New Dicamba Labels Impact Application Timing

👤By Bob Hartzler and Meaghan Anderson, Iowa State University Extension Specialists 🕔Oct 26, 2017

The EPA recently announced changes to the new dicamba labels in response to widespread off-target plant injury in 2016. The most significant change is classification of the new dicamba formulations as Restricted Use Products. Other changes will reduce the hours available

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Dicamba Injury: Estimated 3.1Mln Soybean Acres; Will it Work as PrePlant Burndown? – DTN

Dicamba Injury: Estimated 3.1Mln Soybean Acres; Will it Work as PrePlant Burndown? – DTN

👤By Pam Smith DTN Progressive Farmer Crops Technology Editor 🕔Aug 18, 2017

Jeremy Wolf saw nearly half his soybean acreage injured this summer from dicamba herbicide that went astray. What’s troubling him now, though, is what to do about the situation for the 2018 planting season.  “My entire summer has been consumed

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