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Sunbelt Ag News

DOANE: Cotton Comment

Closing Rice: Futures retraced a portion of recent gains 12-16

Closing Cotton: Market Hits Third Successive Rally High 12-16

Closing Livestock: February Lean Hogs Debuts with Triple Digit Push 12-16

Closing Grain: Finish Higher 12-16

U.S. Stock Market News 12-16

Midday Grain: Market Mixed 12-16

Linn Soybean Commentary: Heavy Volume And Continued Demand Out Of China Support Bean Complex 12-16

Linn Corn Commentary: Funds Lead The Way 12-16

Midday Livestock: Livestock Futures Gaining Momentum 12-16

Kansas: K-State Agronomist Discusses Vertical Tillage - What it Is and How it Works 12-16

Davidson's Farm: Test Plot Results 12-16

Texas: Multi-County Ag Conference Set January 19 in LaCoste 12-16

Opening Cotton: Bounces to Trade Higher 12-16

Texas: Duncan Joins AgriLife Extension as State Small Grains Specialist 12-16

Opening Grains: All Higher Overnight in Relatively Light Activity 12-16

Opening Livestock: Cattle Contracts Should Open Mixed 12-16

K. Good's Farm Policy: Climate Issues; and Chairman Peterson 12-16

Owen Taylor: Why (maybe) it always seems to rain in town 12-16

Georgia Pecans: Grower deliveries light going into second half of December 2009 12-15

Georgia: Nominations Open For Young Peanut Grower Of The Year 12-15

Louisiana Pecans: Deliveries still light, trading interest increases 12-15

Texas Pecans: At mid-December, deliveries light, demand good for better pecans 12-15

DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends 12-15

Dairies to Reduce Gas Emissions 12-15

Taxlink by Andy Biebl 12-15

Linn Wheat Commentary: Overnight markets were weaker as the U.S. 12-15

Texas Research: Strip Tillage and Primed Acclimation Promising for Crop Improvement 12-15

Tennessee: 2010 Milan No-Till Field Day Scheduled 12-15

Louisiana: 2010 Rice Leadership Development Class Announced 12-14

Indiana: Farmers face latest harvest since 1972 12-14

Ag Lending Changes: Struggle for Bankers and Farmers 12-14

Arkansas: Rain Damage Loss Remains at $309 Million 12-14

USDA National Weekly Rice Summary 12-14

Virginia Harvest: Seeing Better than Expected Grades 12-14

Owen Taylor Up Early: Asian Oil Demand, Onions For Energy, Another Tool For Remote Moisture Monitoring 12-14

Mississippi Row Crops Short Course Programs Now On Line: Roundup resistance, insects, fertility, disease management 12-14

FMC introduces Broadhead rice herbicide 12-14

Peanuts: Argentine Planting Off To Reasonable Start, Export Report Includes U.S.-Bound Tonnage 12-14

U.S. Diesel Fuel Cost Survey 12-4

Fruit and Vegetables from STAT

More Ag News | Grain Futures Newswire

Sugar, U.S. Nut Markets

Upcoming Events:

(FD: field day; SS: scout schools)

2010 National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conferences, January 4-7. New Orleans Marriott Hotel and Sheraton New Orleans Hotel.

Tri-State Soybean Conference, Jan. 8, Stoneville, MS.

Kansas: `Keeping the Family Farming´ Workshop, Jan. 9 & 23, Zion Lutheran Church, Beloit (2 sessions).

National Conservation Systems Cotton & Rice Conference
Tunica, MS - Jan. 12-13.

Southern Field Crop Alliance Conference, Jan. 13 & 14, Tunica, Ms.

Kansas: `Keeping the Family Farming´ Workshop, Jan. 16 & 30, Fisher Community Center, Hiawatha (2 sessions).

Texas West Plains Ag Conference, Jan. 18, South Plains College, Hockley County, 806-894-3159 (continuing ed).

Texas Drip Irrigation Workshop, Jan. 19, Brownfield, Terry County, 806-637-4060 (continuing ed).

Texas Southern Mesa Ag Conference, Jan. 19, Lamesa, Dawson County, 806-872-3444 (continuing ed).

Texas Multi-County Agriculture Conference, Jan. 19, 8:30 am, Catered Lunch, Our Lady of Grace Parish, LaCoste.

Texas Caprock Crop Production Conference, Jan. 20, Floyd County Friends Unity Center, Floydada, Floyd County, 806-983-4912 (continuing ed).

North Carolina Southern Cotton Growers/Southeastern Cotton Ginners Annual Meeting, Jan. 20-23, 2 pm, The Westin, Charlotte (pre-register).

Texas Llano Estacado Cotton Conference, Jan. 21, Muleshoe, Bailey County, 806-272-4584 (continuing ed).

Louisiana 2010 Agricultural Outlook Conference: “Keeping Louisiana Agriculture Competitive," Jan. 21, State Evacuation Facility, LSU AgCenter's Dean Lee REC, Alexandria.

Kansas: `Keeping the Family Farming´ Workshop, Jan. 9 & 23, Zion Lutheran Church, Beloit (2 sessions).

Southern Cotton Growers & Ginners Annual Meeting, Jan. 20-23, The Westin, Charlotte, NC.

3rd Annual Georgia Cotton Conference & Georgia Cotton Production Workshop, January 27, 7:30 am, UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center, Tifton.

Kansas: `Keeping the Family Farming´ Workshop, Jan. 16 & 30, Fisher Community Center, Hiawatha (2 sessions).

Texas Llano Estacado Corn Conference, Feb. 9, Castro County Exposition Building, Dimmitt, Castro County, 806-647-4115 (continuing ed).

Texas South Plains Ag Conference, Feb. 10, Brownfield, Terry County, 806-637-4060, (continuing ed).

Texas Cottonseed Variety Meeting, Feb. 10, Farwell, Parmer County at 806-481-3619, (continuing ed).

Texas Cotton Production Meeting, Feb. 11, Lamesa, Dawson County, 806-872-3444, (continuing ed).

Louisiana: 75th Annual Livestock Show Feb. 13-20. Lamar-Dixon Expo Center, Gonzales.

RTWG (Rice Technical Working Group) 33rd Conference, Feb. 22-25, Biloxi, MS.

Texas Cotton Production Meeting, Feb. 22, Tahoka, Lynn County, 806-561-4562, (continuing ed).

Texas Cotton Variety Selection, Cotton Outlook and Fertilizer Management, Feb. 23, Brownfield, Terry County, 806-637-4060, (continuing ed). 

Tennessee: 26th Milan No-Till Crop Production Field Day, July 22, tennu@bellsouth.net

To list an event, contact Owen Taylor

 

Owen Taylor: Why (maybe) it always seems to rain in town

AgFax.Com - Your Online Ag News Source

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A Purdue University scientist contends that man-made changes to the landscape have affected Indian monsoon rains, and he suggests that land-use decisions play an important role in climate change. Sprawling and packed urban areas are seeing an increase in heavy rainfall, according to the researcher, Dev Niyogi, an associate professor of agronomy and earth and atmospheric sciences.

Consider Houston, Texas, if you want a closer example of this effect.Every summer it seems that parts of the city flood, and the rainfall is generally unrelated to hurricanes. The flooding also can play havoc with crop production around the city.“All the asphalt, concrete and buildings accumulate heat, which rises into the atmosphere and creates a kind of thermal wall,” a Texas Extension worker noted last summer during one of those downpours. “When cool air carrying moisture hits that warm wall, it releases the moisture, and you end up with flooding rain in parts of the metro area and in rural areas where the 2 air masses meet.”

In India, this effect is clearly evident, Niyogi says. Some storms in urban areas have dropped as much as 37 inches of rainfall in a single day.

Analysis of the areas that have received increases in heavy seasonal rainfall, based on Indian Meteorological Department and NASA satellite data, showed that those areas were experiencing fast urban growth, which also describes Houston.

"You only see these types of heavy rainfall events in those areas with heavy urbanization," said Niyogi, whose research on the urban effect was published in the International Journal of Climatology. "The more urbanization spreads in those areas, the more of these heavy rain issues we'll see and the more flooding will become a problem."

 Meanwhile, back in the Sierras...

Weekend storms have increased California’s Sierra snowpack – excellent news for farmers in the state’s Central Valley, who depend on winter accumulations for irrigation water in the spring and summer.

California Department of Water Resources officials say it is a good start to the season, the state’s Farm Bureau noted today on its web site. “However, they add this does not mean the drought has ended,” the report emphasized. “The overall snowpack for the Sierra is 95% of average for this date. That compares favorably to the 17% of average last year at this time. The Pacific Ocean El Nino current gives hope to farmers and urban dwellers alike for above-average precipitation, at least in the Central and Southern Sierra.”

A reduced snowpack going into the 2009 crop season meant severe limitations on water allotments in parts of the San Joaquin Valley, which makes up the southern half of the Central Valley and accounts for nearly all of the state’s cotton production area.

Growers and their crop advisors indicate that they will significantly increase cotton acreage in 2010, providing water is available again. Their projections are based on a strong price for Pima cotton and a falloff in other commodity prices, especially for tomatoes and dairy feed.