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Alabama Field Reports: Harvest Hurries Along, Minimal Damage from Nate

Ernst Undesser
From USDA October 17, 2017

Alabama Field Reports: Harvest Hurries Along, Minimal Damage from Nate

Photo: Clemson University

Crop Progress and Condition for the Week Ending October 15, 2017.

County Comments

Henry Dorough, Talladega County
Hurricane Nate brought high winds and plenty of rain to the area early last week but caused relatively minimal damage to crops. Cotton fields defoliated prior to the storm received the worst of the damage with respect to crop losses. Livestock producers are busy planting winter grazing as warm season forage production drops off significantly.

Willie Durr, Houston County
Peanut harvest is in full swing in the Wiregrass. Peanuts are yielding and grading very good thus far. Cotton fared pretty well in the Eastern and Central Wiregrass where wind and rain were lighter. The Western areas had significant damage caused by Hurricane Nate rainfall and high winds.

Dan Porch, Talladega County
A second straight week of very warm temperature with high humidity allowed for good progress on row crop activities including defoliation of cotton, harvest of cotton, peanuts, and soybeans. Some final harvesting of hay on few fields also. Annual hill strawberries planted, winding up harvest on fall tomato crops as well.

Jeffery Smith, Montgomery County
Rain from tropical system put fieldwork on hold for several days. Some producers were back in the field harvesting and defoliating by end of the week.

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General Comments

According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service in Alabama, there were 5.2 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending Sunday, October 15 2017. Precipitation estimates for the state ranged from no rain up to 5.37 inches. Average high temperatures ranged from the high 70s to the low 90s. Average low temperatures ranged from the high 50s to the low 70s.

Ernst Undesser
From USDA October 17, 2017