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Alabama Field Reports: Cotton, Peanut Harvests Sped Up Ahead of Nate

Ernst Undesser
From USDA October 10, 2017

Alabama Field Reports: Cotton, Peanut Harvests Sped Up Ahead of Nate

Crop Progress and Condition for the Week Ending October 8, 2017.

County Comments

Willie Durr, Houston County
Hurricane Nate caused peanut producers to work day and night to get as much harvesting done as possible. Peanut producers dug and picked diseased fields first in order to minimize losses. The jury is still out as far as how much damage was done by the wind to cotton; what was once a bumper crop may turn to an above average crop.

Dan Porch, Blount County
Warm, dry conditions for most of week. Hurricane Nate brought rainfall across the area Saturday afternoon until early morning Sunday. Gusty winds did not cause any damage to crops in the Blount area.

Henry Dorough, Talladega County
Farmers gathered crops prior to the arrival of Hurricane Nate, which ended a long dry harvest period over the past couple of weeks. Cotton defoliation picked up over the past week and the first cotton was picked in advanced of the storm. Soybean harvest continued as more plants are turning yellow and dropping leaves. Livestock farmers hurried to plant winter forages in advanced of the anticipating rainfall from Nate.

Carol Nicholson, Cullman County
Crops are still looking good at this time. Livestock are doing well; hay has had its final harvest of the year. Pasture is normal for this time of the year.

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General Comments

According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service in Alabama, there were 5.9 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending Sunday, October 8, 2017. Precipitation estimates for the state ranged from no rain up to 5.57 inches. Average high temperatures ranged from the high 70s to the high 80s. Average low temperatures ranged from the mid 50s to the high 60s.

Ernst Undesser
From USDA October 10, 2017