The Latest

Texas Sorghum: Sugarcane Aphids in the High Plains

Ernst Undesser
By Pat Porter, Texas AgriLife Extension Entomoligst September 11, 2017

Texas Sorghum: Sugarcane Aphids in the High Plains

Mid-June planted sorghum. The untreated row is on the left. The row on the right was sprayed with 5 oz. of Sivanto. Photo: Texas Sugarcane Aphid News, Texas AgriLife Extension

Even though it is getting late in the season, sorghum is still at risk from sugarcane aphid, especially later planted sorghum. In Lubbock we are seeing leaves with thousands of aphids, and for the last two weeks many of these have been winged. These aphids have and will continue to ride the winds as they do each year.

If this year is like the past three years, the aphids will spread westward and northward. Dr. Ed Bynum in Amarillo is reporting treatable populations in his area. The rains did not stop the aphids, and there is no reason to think they will stop before the first or second hard freeze.

Last year we harvested sorghum at the Halfway Experiment Station after first freeze and still had plenty of aphids on the plants and in the heads.

What I am trying to say is that if you have grain or forage sorghum in the field, this is no time to get complacent. The photos below were taken at the Lubbock Research Center this morning before sunrise.

Leaves being killed by aphids, and honeydew darkening the soil where it dripped.

Leaves on late planted sorghum completely covered by honeydew from the thousands of aphids feeding on the undersides of leaves above. All of the sorghum in this field looked this way.

Mid-June planted sorghum. The untreated row is on the left, obviously. The row on the right was sprayed with 5 oz. of Sivanto.


Source: : http://focusonagriculture.blogspot.com/2017/09/sugarcane-aphid-increasing-on-late.html

Ernst Undesser
By Pat Porter, Texas AgriLife Extension Entomoligst September 11, 2017