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Georgia Field Reports: Rains Too Much of a Good Thing in Some Areas

Ernst Undesser
From USDA June 19, 2017

Georgia Field Reports: Rains Too Much of a Good Thing in Some Areas

Crop Progress and Condition for the Week Ending June 18, 2017.

County Comments

Gary R. Peiffer, DeKalb County
Heavy rains occurred in lots of poorly drained areas. Fungal issues are arising in everything, including lawns and pastures. It is almost too wet right now. 

 

 

Erin Forte, Macon County
Most crops and pastures look good other than in areas where there is standing water from the rain we’ve received in the past two weeks.

Chris Earls, Candler County
Everything is rocking along, but we are starting to see some disease and other issues with crops. It is nothing out of the norm, but it’s just that time. Most of the crops have been planted, except for a few soybeans and peanuts. Tobacco is coming along, and watermelons are continuing to be cut and pulled out of the field. Livestock looks really good. We haven’t seen any rain in a week or so and could use an inch. However, we can manage for a little while longer if need be.

Ty Torrance, Decatur County
Light to heavy rains fell every day this past week. We were happy to get the rain at first, but now it is getting to be too much of a good thing. Severe disease will likely break out in the near future in all crops due to prolonged moisture. Vegetable growers are still having extreme difficulty harvesting crops that are mature but can’t be picked due to the weather.

Herbicide Resistance Info


General Comments

According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service in Georgia, there were 5.2 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending Sunday, June 18, 2017.  Precipitation estimates for the state ranged from no rain to 5.1 inches.  Average high temperatures ranged from the mid 70s to the mid 90s.  Average low temperatures ranged from the low 60s to the mid 70s.

Ernst Undesser
From USDA June 19, 2017