The Latest

Events

  1. Kansas: K-State Program to Help Farmers Deal with Historic Ag Downturn

    December 7, 2016 @ 8:00 am - February 15, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  2. Louisiana: LSU Rice Clinics Scheduled Jan. 5 to Feb. 8 in 6 Locations

    December 20, 2016 @ 8:00 am - February 9, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  3. South Carolina: 4 Upcoming Forest Management Workshops for Woodland Owners

    January 12 @ 8:00 am - February 10 @ 5:00 pm
  4. Minnesota: Weed Resistance Workshops for Jan., Feb.

    January 13 @ 8:00 am - February 24 @ 5:00 pm
  5. Louisiana: LSU Offers 3 Irrigation Workshops in Jan., Feb.

    January 17 @ 8:00 am - February 14 @ 5:00 pm
  6. Illinois: 4 Regional Crop Management Conferences in Jan., Feb.

    January 18 @ 8:00 am - February 15 @ 5:00 pm
  7. Georgia Ag Forecast Series Scheduled Jan. 18-27

    January 18 @ 8:00 am - January 27 @ 5:00 pm
  8. Texas: Pecan Short Course, College Station, Jan 23-26

    January 23 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  9. Missouri: 9 ‘Grow Your Farm’ Sessions from Jan. – March

    January 23 @ 8:00 am - March 11 @ 5:00 pm
  10. Texas: Red River Crops Conference, Childress Jan. 24-25

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - January 25 @ 5:00 pm
  11. South Carolina: Cotton, Peanut Grower Meetings, Sentee, Jan. 24, 26

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  12. Missouri: 4 Farm Retirement, Succession, Estate Planning Workshops in Jan., Feb.

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - February 14 @ 5:00 pm
  13. Arkansas Soil & Water Education Conference, Jonesboro, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  14. Georgia: Cotton Production Workshop, Tifton, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  15. Texas: Feed Grains Marketing Workshop, Amarillo, Jan. 25-26

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  16. Virginia Eastern Shore Ag Conference and Trade Show, Melfa, Jan. 25-27

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - January 27 @ 5:00 pm
  17. Louisiana: Conservation Program Workshop, West Monroe, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  18. Middle Tennessee Grain Conference, Manchester, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  19. Texas: Pesticide Applicator Course, Harleton, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  20. Texas: Feral Hog Program, Falfurrias, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  21. Nebraska Livestock: 8 Nutrient Management Workshops in Jan. and Feb.

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - February 7 @ 5:00 pm
  22. Rice Industry: Upcoming Meetings in MS, AR, LA, in Jan., Feb.

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - February 8 @ 5:00 pm
  23. Texas: Llano Estacado Cotton Conference, Muleshoe, Jan. 30

    January 30 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  24. Texas: Feral Hog Management Workshop, La Vernia, Jan. 30

    January 30 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  25. Alabama: Upcoming Crop Production Meetings, Jan. 30, Feb. 7

    January 30 @ 8:00 am - February 7 @ 5:00 pm
  26. Indiana: Ag Business Management Workshop, West Lafayette, Jan. 31 – Feb. 2

    January 31 @ 8:00 am - February 2 @ 5:00 pm
  27. Texas: ‘Last Chance’ CEU Training, San Angelo, Jan. 31

    January 31 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  28. California: Farm Labor Management Workshops Scheduled in February

    February 1 @ 8:00 am - February 2 @ 5:00 pm
  29. Tennessee: Grain & Soybean Producers Conference, Dyersburg, Feb. 2

    February 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  30. Texas: Grain Elevator Workshop, Amarillo, Feb. 2

    February 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Cleveland on Cotton: Calm Before the Storm? Dry and Wet Push Market.

Debra Ferguson
By O.A. Cleveland, Professor Emeritus, Mississippi State University May 16, 2014

Friday marked the 5th consecutive day of lower closes for the New York ICE old crop and new crop cotton futures. Yet, the true surprise was the absence of any price volatility during the week.

During a period when every analyst and their respective brothers-in-law predicted extreme volatility, the market was calm. In fact, trading typically was within single and double digits, all but unheard of for the past several years.

The real possibility is that this truly is the darkest hour before dawn. Too, the market offered scant new fundamental news.Yes, U.S. export sales, the largest exporter of cotton to the world market, were a downer this week, but A-cancellations were nil, and B-it is still cold/wet/windy in China as well as cold/wet in the Southeast and Midsouth.

With respect to production volume it is only dryer on the Texas Plains.  Thus, fundamentals remain positive.  Additionally, it was thought that textile mills had been active in fixing the price of their on-call sales, but this proved to be incorrect as demonstrated by exchange reports.  Thus, those call sales continue as a firm base of support for the market.

california-cotton-palm-tree-row-03172014-facebookThe old crop slide to just below 90 cents this week is now testing the patience of the bulls, and rightfully so. Prices have reached near the very bottom of the range that must hold if the speculative funds are to remain on the long side of the market.

Were they to exit in mass, the July futures could now slip to near 86 cents. However, the trading range remains in play and until July falls below 87-88 cents. The dominant trading range will continue to be in the 92 to 95 cent area, with an expanded range of 87 to 100 cents.

As commended the past several weeks, cotton demand does not support a price above 94-95 cents. Yet, the significantly large volume of unfixed on-call mill sales, coupled with the extremely large quantity of speculative fund longs in the July contract, could enable another run at 95 cents. Nevertheless, the tug-o-war will continue.

As mentioned last week, USDA’s bold and unusual significant reduction in its projection for the 2014 crop, took a bit of uncertainty out of the market. That is, the large group of speculative traders that had been positioning themselves for a weather related bull market based on the Texas drought (don’t forget about the California drought…yes the acreage is small, but that is 4-bale-per-acre plus land that is lost to cotton), were put on notice that the move above 82 cents in the December contract signaled that the market now “expected” a considerable decline in U.S. production due to the drought.

It will be necessary for the “severe drought” to continue if December is to hurdle the 85 cent mark. There remains plenty of time to get the Midsouth and Southeast crop in, but weather delays are considerably more than normal.

Nighttime temperatures have consistently been in the high 40s and very low 50s, far too low for cotton planting. This will have to change immediately or there will be “real” yield loss. The Texas Plains has its best shot at moisture in 6 months a week from now as the 10 day forecast predicts next weekend there is a 70% chance of rain one day and a 30% change the other two days. The trading range continues.

Debra Ferguson
By O.A. Cleveland, Professor Emeritus, Mississippi State University May 16, 2014