The Latest

Events

  1. Illinois: Crop Management Conferences, Jan. 20 – Feb. 10

    January 20 @ 8:00 am - February 10 @ 8:00 am
  2. Texas: National Cotton Council Annual Meeting, Dallas, Feb. 5-7

    February 5 @ 8:00 am - February 7 @ 5:00 pm
  3. Texas: Wild Pig Management Workshop, Luling, Feb. 9

    February 9 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  4. Ohio: Corn College Workshop, Greenville, Feb. 10

    February 10 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  5. Arkansas State Agribusiness Conference, Jonesboro, Feb. 10

    February 10 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  6. Texas: Feed-Grain Marketing Workshop, Amarillo, Feb. 10-11

    February 10 @ 8:00 am - March 11 @ 5:00 pm
  7. West Florida Crops Meeting, Jay, February 11

    February 11 @ 7:45 am - 12:00 pm
  8. Georgia: Ag Business Planning Workshop, Glennville, Feb. 11, 18

    February 11 @ 8:00 am - February 18 @ 5:00 pm
  9. Alabama-Florida Peanut Trade Show, Dothan, February 11

    February 11 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  10. Four States Agricultural Exposition, Texarkana, Feb. 11

    February 11 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  11. Ohio: Agronomy Workshops, Wooster, Feb. 15, 16

    February 15 @ 8:00 am - February 16 @ 8:00 am
  12. Louisiana: Irrigation Management Workshop, Marksville, Feb. 16-17

    February 16 @ 8:00 am - February 17 @ 8:00 am
  13. Tennessee: Irrigation Meeting, Somerville, Feb. 16

    February 16 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  14. Tennessee: Cotton Focus Meeting, Jackson, Feb. 18

    February 18 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  15. Illinois: Ag Tech Innovation Summit, Champaign, Feb. 18

    February 18 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  16. Texas: Oil, Gas Leasing Workshop, College Station, Feb. 22

    February 22 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  17. Texas: Wild Pig Management Workshop, Burnet, Feb. 24

    February 24 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  18. Virginia: USDA Agricultural Outlook Forum, Arlington, Feb. 25-26

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - February 26 @ 5:00 pm
  19. Georgia: Pest Manager Training, Forsyth, Feb. 25

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  20. Tennessee: Winter Row Crop Marketing Meeting, Mason, Feb. 25

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  21. Texas: Rice Technical Working Group, Galveston, March 1-4

    March 1 @ 8:00 am - March 4 @ 8:00 am
  22. Indiana Small Farm Conference, Danville, March 4-5

    March 4 @ 8:00 am - March 5 @ 5:00 pm
  23. Kansas: 103rd Annual Cattlemen’s Day, Manhattan, March 4

    March 4 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  24. Kentucky: Integrated Pest Management Training, Princeton, March 2

    March 6 @ 8:00 am
  25. Oklahoma: Irrigation Conference, Woodward, March 8

    March 8 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  26. Oklahoma: Pecan Management Course, Stillwater, March 8

    March 8 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  27. Missouri: Free Pesticide Collection Event, Portageville, March 12

    March 12 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  28. Florida: Carinata Summit, Quincy, March 15-16

    March 15 @ 8:00 am - March 16 @ 5:00 pm

 

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Texas Rice: What is this larvae?

Debra Ferguson
By: M.O. (Mo) Way, Professor of Entomology, Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center May 9, 2014

Texas Rice: What is this larvae?

As of May 2, according to the Texas Rice Crop Survey, 85, 75 and 1% of our Texas rice crop has been planted, has emerged and has been flooded, respectively. So, we are behind relative to past years due to cold wet weather during the early spring. However, April for the most part was cool and very dry.

At the Beaumont Center for April, we recorded less than 2 inches rainfall. Generally, dry conditions favor chinch bug populations and damage, but I have not observed much chinch bug damage this year.

I recently inspected a rice field in Liberty County and did see a few adult chinch bugs, but I don’t think they were damaging the rice to any extent. The farmer was preparing to flush the field which often drowns the insects and/or moves them up the plant where feeding causes much less damage compared to feeding at or below ground level. I also have observed some herbicide toxicity which I think results from cool weather slowing growth and metabolism of rice.

Poor Stand Culprits – What is this attacker?

Unidentified larva feeding on germinating rice seed. Photo: Dr. Mo Way

Unidentified larva feeding on germinating rice seed. Photo: Dr. Mo Way

 

In April, I was called out to a rice field to determine why the stand was poor. The field was planted in March and had endured exceptionally cold weather. The soil was clayey, had a lot of organic matter and had not been farmed in rice for years. I think seedling diseases were problematic, but we did find a few insect larvae attacking the germinating seed.

I know the larvae were not immature grape colaspis. I thought they may be wireworms, but upon closer inspection under the microscope, I tentatively identified them as rootworms. They are about 7/16 inch long (I think they are late instar larvae), are cream-colored, possess 6 thoracic legs, and have a brown head capsule and a brown terminal plate.

I have never observed these larvae attacking rice. About the same time, I inspected a grain sorghum field and observed the same type of larvae attacking the roots of seedling grain sorghum plants. Again, I was not familiar with these larvae, but they strongly resembled the larvae attacking germinating rice.

I plan to send the larvae to a corn rootworm entomologist for identification. Corn rootworm larvae are very serious pests in the Midwest. Here on the Gulf Coast of Texas, the adults of rootworms are very common in soybean fields.

The banded cucumber beetle and spotted cucumber beetle are the adults of rootworm larvae. The adults are foliage feeders and the larvae live underground and feed on the roots of their host plants.

I will keep you posted of further developments. I’m sure these larvae cannot survive a flood and maybe not a flush. I don’t want to alarm folks, because I don’t think this is a serious pest, but we need to be on the lookout for it. So, if you see larvae feeding on the roots of your rice plants before the flood, please contact me at 409-658-2186 or moway@aesrg.tamu.edu.

I hope you join me in Costa Rica later this month for the Rice Market and Technology Convention—Pura Vida!

Debra Ferguson
By: M.O. (Mo) Way, Professor of Entomology, Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center May 9, 2014