The Latest

Events

  1. Kansas: K-State Program to Help Farmers Deal with Historic Ag Downturn

    December 7, 2016 @ 8:00 am - February 15, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  2. Louisiana: LSU Rice Clinics Scheduled Jan. 5 to Feb. 8 in 6 Locations

    December 20, 2016 @ 8:00 am - February 9, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  3. South Carolina: 4 Upcoming Forest Management Workshops for Woodland Owners

    January 12 @ 8:00 am - February 10 @ 5:00 pm
  4. Minnesota: Weed Resistance Workshops for Jan., Feb.

    January 13 @ 8:00 am - February 24 @ 5:00 pm
  5. Louisiana: LSU Offers 3 Irrigation Workshops in Jan., Feb.

    January 17 @ 8:00 am - February 14 @ 5:00 pm
  6. Illinois: 4 Regional Crop Management Conferences in Jan., Feb.

    January 18 @ 8:00 am - February 15 @ 5:00 pm
  7. Georgia Ag Forecast Series Scheduled Jan. 18-27

    January 18 @ 8:00 am - January 27 @ 5:00 pm
  8. Texas: Pecan Short Course, College Station, Jan 23-26

    January 23 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  9. Missouri: 9 ‘Grow Your Farm’ Sessions from Jan. – March

    January 23 @ 8:00 am - March 11 @ 5:00 pm
  10. Texas: Red River Crops Conference, Childress Jan. 24-25

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - January 25 @ 5:00 pm
  11. South Carolina: Cotton, Peanut Grower Meetings, Sentee, Jan. 24, 26

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  12. Missouri: 4 Farm Retirement, Succession, Estate Planning Workshops in Jan., Feb.

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - February 14 @ 5:00 pm
  13. Arkansas Soil & Water Education Conference, Jonesboro, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  14. Georgia: Cotton Production Workshop, Tifton, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  15. Texas: Feed Grains Marketing Workshop, Amarillo, Jan. 25-26

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  16. Virginia Eastern Shore Ag Conference and Trade Show, Melfa, Jan. 25-27

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - January 27 @ 5:00 pm
  17. Louisiana: Conservation Program Workshop, West Monroe, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  18. Middle Tennessee Grain Conference, Manchester, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  19. Texas: Pesticide Applicator Course, Harleton, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  20. Texas: Feral Hog Program, Falfurrias, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  21. Nebraska Livestock: 8 Nutrient Management Workshops in Jan. and Feb.

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - February 7 @ 5:00 pm
  22. Rice Industry: Upcoming Meetings in MS, AR, LA, in Jan., Feb.

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - February 8 @ 5:00 pm
  23. Texas: Llano Estacado Cotton Conference, Muleshoe, Jan. 30

    January 30 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  24. Texas: Feral Hog Management Workshop, La Vernia, Jan. 30

    January 30 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  25. Alabama: Upcoming Crop Production Meetings, Jan. 30, Feb. 7

    January 30 @ 8:00 am - February 7 @ 5:00 pm
  26. Indiana: Ag Business Management Workshop, West Lafayette, Jan. 31 – Feb. 2

    January 31 @ 8:00 am - February 2 @ 5:00 pm
  27. Texas: ‘Last Chance’ CEU Training, San Angelo, Jan. 31

    January 31 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  28. California: Farm Labor Management Workshops Scheduled in February

    February 1 @ 8:00 am - February 2 @ 5:00 pm
  29. Tennessee: Grain & Soybean Producers Conference, Dyersburg, Feb. 2

    February 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  30. Texas: Grain Elevator Workshop, Amarillo, Feb. 2

    February 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Rice Commentary: Blends Increase Competitive Pricing

Debra Ferguson
By Dwight Roberts President & CEO, USRPA May 9, 2014

Rice farmers in the US continue to express concern about market developments in Mexico. The number one market for US long grain is facing stiff competition from SE Asian suppliers.

The fact is that at least 30% of the market is for high quality rice, represented by the fact that Uruguayan milled rice with its high amylose, low chalk varieties has reached sales of over 40,000 tons per year. Uruguayan milled prices delivered to Mexico are on par with US milled prices ($610/ton aprox Laredo).

Mexican consumers increasingly demand higher quality although the market is largely price driven. Similar to other markets, eye appeal is the number one factor when a Mexican consumer makes a purchase decision.  Sources tell USRPA that 5% of Vietnamese rice sold in the Wholesale Market and other areas is many times labeled as Uruguayan or other origin.

The mixing and blending of rice has always been an important game to play in the competitive market.  Ironically many of the varieties grown in Uruguay have their origin in the United States and we expect there will be a tendency to return to more “product” than commodity, especially if we are going to compete with such strong competition.

In April, Mexico imported 65,655 MT of rice, of which 42,658 MT (65%) was rough rice from the US, and 21,277 MT of milled rice. The milled rice was reported to have originated in Thailand, Uruguay, Vietnam, and the US. Our sources report that Vietnam and Thailand rice continues to be offered aggressively to wholesalers and packers in Mexico at price levels that are $150-$200 per ton lower than US product.

The Rice Advocate

Debra Ferguson
By Dwight Roberts President & CEO, USRPA May 9, 2014