The Latest

Events

  1. Kansas: K-State Program to Help Farmers Deal with Historic Ag Downturn

    December 7, 2016 @ 8:00 am - February 15, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  2. Louisiana: LSU Rice Clinics Scheduled Jan. 5 to Feb. 8 in 6 Locations

    December 20, 2016 @ 8:00 am - February 9, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  3. South Carolina: 4 Upcoming Forest Management Workshops for Woodland Owners

    January 12 @ 8:00 am - February 10 @ 5:00 pm
  4. Minnesota: Weed Resistance Workshops for Jan., Feb.

    January 13 @ 8:00 am - February 24 @ 5:00 pm
  5. Louisiana: LSU Offers 3 Irrigation Workshops in Jan., Feb.

    January 17 @ 8:00 am - February 14 @ 5:00 pm
  6. Illinois: 4 Regional Crop Management Conferences in Jan., Feb.

    January 18 @ 8:00 am - February 15 @ 5:00 pm
  7. Georgia Ag Forecast Series Scheduled Jan. 18-27

    January 18 @ 8:00 am - January 27 @ 5:00 pm
  8. Texas: Pecan Short Course, College Station, Jan 23-26

    January 23 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  9. Missouri: 9 ‘Grow Your Farm’ Sessions from Jan. – March

    January 23 @ 8:00 am - March 11 @ 5:00 pm
  10. Texas: Red River Crops Conference, Childress Jan. 24-25

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - January 25 @ 5:00 pm
  11. South Carolina: Cotton, Peanut Grower Meetings, Sentee, Jan. 24, 26

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  12. Missouri: 4 Farm Retirement, Succession, Estate Planning Workshops in Jan., Feb.

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - February 14 @ 5:00 pm
  13. Arkansas Soil & Water Education Conference, Jonesboro, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  14. Georgia: Cotton Production Workshop, Tifton, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  15. Texas: Feed Grains Marketing Workshop, Amarillo, Jan. 25-26

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  16. Virginia Eastern Shore Ag Conference and Trade Show, Melfa, Jan. 25-27

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - January 27 @ 5:00 pm
  17. Louisiana: Conservation Program Workshop, West Monroe, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  18. Middle Tennessee Grain Conference, Manchester, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  19. Texas: Pesticide Applicator Course, Harleton, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  20. Texas: Feral Hog Program, Falfurrias, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  21. Nebraska Livestock: 8 Nutrient Management Workshops in Jan. and Feb.

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - February 7 @ 5:00 pm
  22. Rice Industry: Upcoming Meetings in MS, AR, LA, in Jan., Feb.

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - February 8 @ 5:00 pm
  23. Texas: Llano Estacado Cotton Conference, Muleshoe, Jan. 30

    January 30 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  24. Texas: Feral Hog Management Workshop, La Vernia, Jan. 30

    January 30 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  25. Alabama: Upcoming Crop Production Meetings, Jan. 30, Feb. 7

    January 30 @ 8:00 am - February 7 @ 5:00 pm
  26. Indiana: Ag Business Management Workshop, West Lafayette, Jan. 31 – Feb. 2

    January 31 @ 8:00 am - February 2 @ 5:00 pm
  27. Texas: ‘Last Chance’ CEU Training, San Angelo, Jan. 31

    January 31 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  28. California: Farm Labor Management Workshops Scheduled in February

    February 1 @ 8:00 am - February 2 @ 5:00 pm
  29. Tennessee: Grain & Soybean Producers Conference, Dyersburg, Feb. 2

    February 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  30. Texas: Grain Elevator Workshop, Amarillo, Feb. 2

    February 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Florida: Western Flower Thrips Develop Insecticide Resistance

Ernst Undesser
By Joe Funderburk, University of Florida May 9, 2014

The western flower thrips and thrips-vectored Tomato spotted wilt virus are key pest threats to Florida’s multi-billion dollar fruit and vegetable industry. Attempts to control the western flower thrips with broad-spectrum insecticides, applied on a routine calendar schedule actually elevates its pest status.

Western flower thrips have now developed resistance to most traditional insecticides, including the IPM-compatible spinosyns. Spinosyn insecticides include SpinTor, Radiant, and Entrust (organic label). As a result, producers are experiencing unacceptable losses from pest damage and ineffective pesticide applications.

Western flower thrips populations are regularly monitored for resistance in different crops and regions of Florida. The first record of resistance occurred in Palm Beach County in 2008. An educational program to enhance adoption of integrated pest management (IPM) was begun, and the use of spinosyn insecticides was temporarily suspended in Palm Beach and Broward Counties.

 

More recently, resistant western flower thrips populations that are resistant to spinosyns were detected in Hillsborough County. Populations in North Florida have remained susceptible, although a single resistant population was detected last year.

Preserving the use of the spinosyns against the western flower thrips is a high priority because:

  1. No insecticide has provided the high level of control;
  2. It conserves populations of the key thrips predator, the minute pirate bugs;
  3. It has a reduced-risk status;
  4. It has a broad-spectrum of activity against other important pests.

A resistance management protocol that is a good foundation for a sound IPM program includes the following components: positive identification of target pests, applying insecticides only when required, making accurate and precise insecticide applications, diversifying the types of management methods used in the crop, and conserving natural enemies.

In efforts to sustain the effectiveness of spinosyns in Florida, no more than two applications should be made on the same and sequential crops per year.  Be sure to understand spinosyn susceptibility in your growing area, and if new recommendations exist to optimize thrips management and spinosyn susceptibility.

Ernst Undesser
By Joe Funderburk, University of Florida May 9, 2014