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  2. Arkansas: 5 Income Tax Schools in Nov, Dec.

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  3. Mississippi: Row Crop Short Course, Starkville, Dec. 5-7

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  5. Kentucky: 2016 Early Bird Meetings, Dec. 6-8

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  8. Kansas: Ag Law & Lease Workshop, Salina, Dec. 6

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  9. Texas: Private Pesticide Applicator License Training, Dec. 6, 15

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  10. Kansas: K-State Program to Help Farmers Deal with Historic Ag Downturn

    December 7, 2016 @ 8:00 am - February 15, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  11. Texas: Field Crops and Beef Workshop, Edna, Dec. 8

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  13. Alabama: Corn and Wheat Short Course, Auburn, Dec. 12-13

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  15. Indiana: Crop Adviser Conference, Indianapolis, Dec. 13-14

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  17. Missouri: Crop Management Conference, Columbia, Dec. 15-16

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  18. South Carolina: Ag Marketing Seminar, Myrtle Beach, Jan. 4-6

    January 4, 2017 @ 8:00 am - January 6, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  19. South Carolina: 4 Upcoming Forest Management Workshops for Woodland Owners

    January 12, 2017 @ 8:00 am - February 10, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  20. Illinois: 4 Regional Crop Management Conferences in Jan., Feb.

    January 18, 2017 @ 8:00 am - February 15, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  21. Texas: Red River Crops Conference, Childress Jan. 24-25

    January 24, 2017 @ 8:00 am - January 25, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  22. Indiana: Ag Business Management Workshop, West Lafayette, Jan. 31 – Feb. 2

    January 31, 2017 @ 8:00 am - February 2, 2017 @ 5:00 pm

Texas Cotton: High Plains Ready to Roll Where There is Moisture – AgFax

Larry Stalcup
By Larry Stalcup, AgFax Southwest Editor May 2, 2014

High Plains planters are expected to be rolling next week – but continued lack of soil moisture will keep some tractors idle.

Photo: Larry Stalcup

Photo: Larry Stalcup

At Friday’s Plains Cotton Advisory Group meeting in Lubbock. Shawn Holladay, Lamesa-Dawson County grower and president of Plains Cotton Growers, Inc., said he’s “waiting on a planting rain” on many  of his fields. However, parts of Eastern Dawson County still have a good soil profile, thanks to a few timely rains and above normal snow.

Tighter irrigation distribution is anticipated this year with growers planning to irrigate only 40 acres under a 120-acre pivot. Many growers are still unsettled on what crop to plant. Without a solid rain event, much seed may be returned.

Highlights:

• “There’s still some indecision on what will go in the ground,” said Jason Woodward, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension plant pathologist. “A lot of cotton will be watered up.” Fortunately, a 30-40% chance of rain is in the 10-day regional forecast. Other

Steve Verett, PCG executive VP, said extreme wind and blowing dust the past month is another reason why “you can’t farm this land flat,” without a cover crop or residue to offset blowing.

Temperatures in the 90s are expected to greet Rolling Plains growers the coming week. Some in that region received good rainfall recently.

Crop insurance and good resource management “has saved this country” the last three drought years, noted Holladay, adding, that insurance money “has been put back into soil management to help hold it and prevent blowing.”

Larry Stalcup
By Larry Stalcup, AgFax Southwest Editor May 2, 2014