The Latest

Events

  1. Kansas: K-State Program to Help Farmers Deal with Historic Ag Downturn

    December 7, 2016 @ 8:00 am - February 15, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  2. Louisiana: LSU Rice Clinics Scheduled Jan. 5 to Feb. 8 in 6 Locations

    December 20, 2016 @ 8:00 am - February 9, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  3. South Carolina: 4 Upcoming Forest Management Workshops for Woodland Owners

    January 12 @ 8:00 am - February 10 @ 5:00 pm
  4. Minnesota: Weed Resistance Workshops for Jan., Feb.

    January 13 @ 8:00 am - February 24 @ 5:00 pm
  5. Louisiana: LSU Offers 3 Irrigation Workshops in Jan., Feb.

    January 17 @ 8:00 am - February 14 @ 5:00 pm
  6. Illinois: 4 Regional Crop Management Conferences in Jan., Feb.

    January 18 @ 8:00 am - February 15 @ 5:00 pm
  7. Georgia Ag Forecast Series Scheduled Jan. 18-27

    January 18 @ 8:00 am - January 27 @ 5:00 pm
  8. Texas Farm Workshop: Vets, Active Duty Military and Beginners, Overton, Jan. 21

    January 21 @ 8:00 am - January 22 @ 5:00 pm
  9. Agronomy Essentials Workshop – Salina, Kansas, January 23

    January 23 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  10. Texas: Pecan Short Course, College Station, Jan 23-26

    January 23 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  11. Missouri: 9 ‘Grow Your Farm’ Sessions from Jan. – March

    January 23 @ 8:00 am - March 11 @ 5:00 pm
  12. Texas: Red River Crops Conference, Childress Jan. 24-25

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - January 25 @ 5:00 pm
  13. South Carolina: Cotton, Peanut Grower Meetings, Sentee, Jan. 24, 26

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  14. Missouri: 4 Farm Retirement, Succession, Estate Planning Workshops in Jan., Feb.

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - February 14 @ 5:00 pm
  15. Arkansas Soil & Water Education Conference, Jonesboro, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  16. Georgia: Cotton Production Workshop, Tifton, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  17. Texas: Feed Grains Marketing Workshop, Amarillo, Jan. 25-26

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  18. Virginia Eastern Shore Ag Conference and Trade Show, Melfa, Jan. 25-27

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - January 27 @ 5:00 pm
  19. Louisiana: Conservation Program Workshop, West Monroe, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  20. Middle Tennessee Grain Conference, Manchester, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  21. Texas: Pesticide Applicator Course, Harleton, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  22. Texas: Feral Hog Program, Falfurrias, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  23. Nebraska Livestock: 8 Nutrient Management Workshops in Jan. and Feb.

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - February 7 @ 5:00 pm
  24. Texas: Llano Estacado Cotton Conference, Muleshoe, Jan. 30

    January 30 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  25. Texas: Feral Hog Management Workshop, La Vernia, Jan. 30

    January 30 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  26. Indiana: Ag Business Management Workshop, West Lafayette, Jan. 31 – Feb. 2

    January 31 @ 8:00 am - February 2 @ 5:00 pm
  27. Texas: ‘Last Chance’ CEU Training, San Angelo, Jan. 31

    January 31 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  28. California: Farm Labor Management Workshops Scheduled in February

    February 1 @ 8:00 am - February 2 @ 5:00 pm
  29. Tennessee: Grain & Soybean Producers Conference, Dyersburg, Feb. 2

    February 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  30. Texas: Grain Elevator Workshop, Amarillo, Feb. 2

    February 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Louisiana: Glyphosate Resistance Confirmed in Italian Ryegrass

Ernst Undesser
By Bruce Schultz, LSU AgCenter April 14, 2014

LSU AgCenter weed scientists confirmed that farmers will now have to contend with another herbicide-resistant weed, Italian ryegrass.

Daniel Stephenson, LSU AgCenter weed scientist, said seed from two fields in Tensas Parish was used to grow the plant to confirm resistance to glyphosate.

“It is pretty well widespread in the northeast part of the state and has been found in St. Landry Parish as well,” he said.

The weed has the potential to rob a corn plant of 75 percent of its yield. It also poses a problem for later-planted crops such as cotton and soybeans because clumps of dead Italian ryegrass can interfere with planting and seedling growth.

A fall application of an alternative herbicide, Dual Magnum, is the best way to control it, he said, but the regular burn-down herbicide treatment of glyphosate and 2,4-D won’t kill it. Dual Magnum also has the added benefit of suppressing the weed henbit, he said.

Italian rye grass - Annual Rye Grass - Lolium perenne ssp. multiflorum Credit: Mississippi State University

Italian rye grass – Annual Rye Grass – Lolium perenne ssp. multiflorum Credit: Mississippi State University

 

The Mississippi State University protocol for adoption of a glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass management program was developed in response to the weed’s discovery in that state two years ago.

The protocol is on the Web here.

Donnie Miller, AgCenter weed scientist, said Italian ryegrass, even if it’s not herbicide-resistant, has been a problem for row crops. “It’s going to suck moisture out of the seedbed,” Miller said.

Because it is a winter annual, the weed could cause problems for wheat, Miller said. “It competes directly with the crop.”

In addition, Italian ryegrass seed can be comingled at harvest with wheat grain, causing quality issues when a crop is sold, Miller said.

Stephenson said the plant emerges in September and October. Then its emergence slows in December, but it emerges again in January.

He said farmers who neglect to treat the weed in the fall will pay more in the form of additional herbicide treatments in the spring before planting.

Stephenson said the MSU guidelines indicate that two applications of paraquat at a high rate can control it now and stop seed production, but this would be considered a salvage treatment.

It typically is found on roadsides, in ditches and on the edges of fields, he said, and farmers working their land unknowingly spread the seed across a field.

But Miller said Italian ryegrass is not as prolific of a seed producer as Palmer amaranth, which also has developed herbicide resistance, so farmers can see the gradual spread of the weed across the field.

“It’s like watching a hurricane versus a tornado,” Miller said. “With Italian ryegrass, you can see it coming.”

In addition to Italian ryegrass and Palmer amaranth, weeds recently found to have developed glyphosate herbicide resistance include johnsongrass, rice flatsedge and barnyardgrass.

 

Ernst Undesser
By Bruce Schultz, LSU AgCenter April 14, 2014