The Latest

Events

  1. Kansas: K-State Program to Help Farmers Deal with Historic Ag Downturn

    December 7, 2016 @ 8:00 am - February 15, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  2. Louisiana: LSU Rice Clinics Scheduled Jan. 5 to Feb. 8 in 6 Locations

    December 20, 2016 @ 8:00 am - February 9, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  3. South Carolina: 4 Upcoming Forest Management Workshops for Woodland Owners

    January 12 @ 8:00 am - February 10 @ 5:00 pm
  4. Minnesota: Weed Resistance Workshops for Jan., Feb.

    January 13 @ 8:00 am - February 24 @ 5:00 pm
  5. Louisiana: LSU Offers 3 Irrigation Workshops in Jan., Feb.

    January 17 @ 8:00 am - February 14 @ 5:00 pm
  6. Illinois: 4 Regional Crop Management Conferences in Jan., Feb.

    January 18 @ 8:00 am - February 15 @ 5:00 pm
  7. Georgia Ag Forecast Series Scheduled Jan. 18-27

    January 18 @ 8:00 am - January 27 @ 5:00 pm
  8. Texas Farm Workshop: Vets, Active Duty Military and Beginners, Overton, Jan. 21

    January 21 @ 8:00 am - January 22 @ 5:00 pm
  9. Agronomy Essentials Workshop – Salina, Kansas, January 23

    January 23 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  10. Texas: Pecan Short Course, College Station, Jan 23-26

    January 23 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  11. Missouri: 9 ‘Grow Your Farm’ Sessions from Jan. – March

    January 23 @ 8:00 am - March 11 @ 5:00 pm
  12. Texas: Red River Crops Conference, Childress Jan. 24-25

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - January 25 @ 5:00 pm
  13. South Carolina: Cotton, Peanut Grower Meetings, Sentee, Jan. 24, 26

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  14. Missouri: 4 Farm Retirement, Succession, Estate Planning Workshops in Jan., Feb.

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - February 14 @ 5:00 pm
  15. Arkansas Soil & Water Education Conference, Jonesboro, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  16. Georgia: Cotton Production Workshop, Tifton, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  17. Texas: Feed Grains Marketing Workshop, Amarillo, Jan. 25-26

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  18. Virginia Eastern Shore Ag Conference and Trade Show, Melfa, Jan. 25-27

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - January 27 @ 5:00 pm
  19. Louisiana: Conservation Program Workshop, West Monroe, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  20. Middle Tennessee Grain Conference, Manchester, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  21. Texas: Pesticide Applicator Course, Harleton, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  22. Texas: Feral Hog Program, Falfurrias, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  23. Nebraska Livestock: 8 Nutrient Management Workshops in Jan. and Feb.

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - February 7 @ 5:00 pm
  24. Texas: Llano Estacado Cotton Conference, Muleshoe, Jan. 30

    January 30 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  25. Texas: Feral Hog Management Workshop, La Vernia, Jan. 30

    January 30 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  26. Indiana: Ag Business Management Workshop, West Lafayette, Jan. 31 – Feb. 2

    January 31 @ 8:00 am - February 2 @ 5:00 pm
  27. Texas: ‘Last Chance’ CEU Training, San Angelo, Jan. 31

    January 31 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  28. California: Farm Labor Management Workshops Scheduled in February

    February 1 @ 8:00 am - February 2 @ 5:00 pm
  29. Tennessee: Grain & Soybean Producers Conference, Dyersburg, Feb. 2

    February 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  30. Texas: Grain Elevator Workshop, Amarillo, Feb. 2

    February 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Arkansas Livestock: Control Weeds Now for Better Pastures This Summer

Ernst Undesser
By Carol Sanders, University of Arkansas March 7, 2014

With no green showing in the pasture, few livestock producers are thinking about weed control, but now is the ideal time to control troublesome pasture weeds, says Dr. David Fernandez, Cooperative Extension Program livestock specialist at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff.

Not only are some weeds toxic to cattle, but also weeds adversely affect livestock operations in many ways. Weeds compete with desirable pasture grasses and legumes for nutrients. Some are unpalatable; livestock will not eat them so less feed is available in the pasture, says Dr. Fernandez. Some weeds cause injuries or pain if they have thorns.

“Weed control can be an effective way to increase production by improving forage availability,” says Dr. Fernandez. Mowing, grazing, improving soil fertility and herbicide spraying are some of the ways to control weeds. Mowing should be done in the boot stage before flowers emerge. Weeds can flower and set seed very quickly. Once the seeds develop, mowing just spreads them further into pastures.

 

Some weeds are both palatable and nutritious early in the growth, and livestock will readily graze them. To control weeds by grazing, subdivide weedy pastures, and place a high concentration of animals on one paddock, advises Dr. Fernandez. The animals will eat or trample the weeds. The grass can recover once the animals are moved to the next paddock. Grazing should not be used to control weeds toxic to livestock, warns Dr. Fernandez.

Weeds can outcompete more desirable species under conditions of low fertility. Most of Arkansas’s better pasture grasses and legumes do poorly in acidic soils. Phosphate and potash levels in Arkansas soils tend to be lower than optimum for many forages. Adding lime to control soil pH and fertilizing according to soil test results can give grasses and legumes a chance to outcompete the weeds after an initial round of another control method.

Some common weeds in Arkansas respond well to late winter/early spring herbicide treatment including buttercup, the first weed to emerge, wild garlic or wild onion and thistles. Spraying now for buttercup will prevent pastures from turning yellow with buttercup flowers this spring. Thistles are best treated in the rosette stage before he flower stalk begins to grow.

Two common, toxic Arkansas weeds, bitter sneezeweed and woolly croton, are best treated in May and June, says Dr. Fernandez. Extension publication MP 44 Recommended Chemicals for Weed and Brush Control contains herbicide recommendations for pasture weeds, and your county Extension agent can help you choose which herbicide is most appropriate for the weeds on your farm.

Ernst Undesser
By Carol Sanders, University of Arkansas March 7, 2014