The Latest

Events

  1. Kansas: K-State Program to Help Farmers Deal with Historic Ag Downturn

    December 7, 2016 @ 8:00 am - February 15, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  2. Louisiana: LSU Rice Clinics Scheduled Jan. 5 to Feb. 8 in 6 Locations

    December 20, 2016 @ 8:00 am - February 9, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
  3. South Carolina: 4 Upcoming Forest Management Workshops for Woodland Owners

    January 12 @ 8:00 am - February 10 @ 5:00 pm
  4. Minnesota: Weed Resistance Workshops for Jan., Feb.

    January 13 @ 8:00 am - February 24 @ 5:00 pm
  5. Louisiana: LSU Offers 3 Irrigation Workshops in Jan., Feb.

    January 17 @ 8:00 am - February 14 @ 5:00 pm
  6. Illinois: 4 Regional Crop Management Conferences in Jan., Feb.

    January 18 @ 8:00 am - February 15 @ 5:00 pm
  7. Georgia Ag Forecast Series Scheduled Jan. 18-27

    January 18 @ 8:00 am - January 27 @ 5:00 pm
  8. Texas: Pecan Short Course, College Station, Jan 23-26

    January 23 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  9. Missouri: 9 ‘Grow Your Farm’ Sessions from Jan. – March

    January 23 @ 8:00 am - March 11 @ 5:00 pm
  10. Texas: Red River Crops Conference, Childress Jan. 24-25

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - January 25 @ 5:00 pm
  11. South Carolina: Cotton, Peanut Grower Meetings, Sentee, Jan. 24, 26

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  12. Missouri: 4 Farm Retirement, Succession, Estate Planning Workshops in Jan., Feb.

    January 24 @ 8:00 am - February 14 @ 5:00 pm
  13. Arkansas Soil & Water Education Conference, Jonesboro, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  14. Georgia: Cotton Production Workshop, Tifton, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  15. Texas: Feed Grains Marketing Workshop, Amarillo, Jan. 25-26

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - January 26 @ 5:00 pm
  16. Virginia Eastern Shore Ag Conference and Trade Show, Melfa, Jan. 25-27

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - January 27 @ 5:00 pm
  17. Louisiana: Conservation Program Workshop, West Monroe, Jan. 25

    January 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  18. Middle Tennessee Grain Conference, Manchester, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  19. Texas: Pesticide Applicator Course, Harleton, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  20. Texas: Feral Hog Program, Falfurrias, Jan. 26

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  21. Nebraska Livestock: 8 Nutrient Management Workshops in Jan. and Feb.

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - February 7 @ 5:00 pm
  22. Rice Industry: Upcoming Meetings in MS, AR, LA, in Jan., Feb.

    January 26 @ 8:00 am - February 8 @ 5:00 pm
  23. Texas: Llano Estacado Cotton Conference, Muleshoe, Jan. 30

    January 30 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  24. Texas: Feral Hog Management Workshop, La Vernia, Jan. 30

    January 30 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  25. Alabama: Upcoming Crop Production Meetings, Jan. 30, Feb. 7

    January 30 @ 8:00 am - February 7 @ 5:00 pm
  26. Indiana: Ag Business Management Workshop, West Lafayette, Jan. 31 – Feb. 2

    January 31 @ 8:00 am - February 2 @ 5:00 pm
  27. Texas: ‘Last Chance’ CEU Training, San Angelo, Jan. 31

    January 31 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  28. California: Farm Labor Management Workshops Scheduled in February

    February 1 @ 8:00 am - February 2 @ 5:00 pm
  29. Tennessee: Grain & Soybean Producers Conference, Dyersburg, Feb. 2

    February 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  30. Texas: Grain Elevator Workshop, Amarillo, Feb. 2

    February 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Louisiana: Strawberry Crop Set Back by Recent Cold Snap

Ernst Undesser
By Johnny Morgan, LSU AgCenter January 14, 2014

Recent cold weather caused a slowdown in strawberry production, and that will delay some of the sales that growers were hoping for.

Before the recent cold snap, farmers were harvesting from the plug plants they planted in September and were about ready to start harvesting from the bare-rooted plants that were planted in mid-October, according to Sandra Benjamin, LSU AgCenter agent in Tangipahoa Parish.

“All the blooms and green fruit on the bare-rooted plants were lost due to the freeze,” Benjamin said.  Most farmers had been harvesting from their plug plants, which have been producing berries since November.

Plants had been covered most of December, Benjamin said.

 

The row covers growers used to protect their crop don’t hurt the plants, but they do allow mold to grow because they are in a greenhouse-type situation, said Ponchatoula-area grower Eric Morrow.

“This has been some of the coldest weather that we have seen in years,” Morrow said. “Anytime the weather is in the 30s, we have to cover, and that has been the case most of the month of December.”

The cold weather won’t kill the plants, Morrow said, but it slows things down so growers won’t have the berries they would like to have this month.

“Strawberry plants are really, really tough,” he said. “The cold weather actually reinvigorates them, and they’ll come on with a vengeance. In late March and April we ought to have plenty of berries.”

Benjamin said last year growers had a wet winter, especially in December, which caused a lot of plants to die.

“Too much water causing no oxygen in the root system was one problem,” she said. “Rows collapsed and plants just did not grow as well, which caused the production to be down.”

Benjamin said growers would prefer cold and freezing temperatures anytime instead of continuous rain.

About 20 commercial strawberry farmers are in the state, and about 25 home gardeners grow strawberries in Tangipahoa Parish, Benjamin said.

“The commercial growers cut down on acreage this year, so there are about 285 total acres of strawberries planted in Tangipahoa Parish,” Benjamin said. “Last season there were about 350 acres.”

The reduction in acreage is due to the loss of last year’s production, she said.

“We are not losing strawberry growers, but we’re not gaining any new growers either,” she said.  “The largest operation is about 80 acres, and the others are from one to 20 acres.”

Ernst Undesser
By Johnny Morgan, LSU AgCenter January 14, 2014