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    July 1, 2013
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    South Carolina: Cotton and Soybean Planting Nearing Finish – US-DA

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    From USDA

    Crop Progress and Condition for the Week Ending June 30, 2013.

    GENERAL

    Most of the State experienced hot, humid mornings followed by scattered afternoon rain showers. Rainfall levels ranged from 0.29 inches in the Upstate to 7.56 inches on the coast near Myrtle Beach. Many producers were able to spend time in their fields, making substantial progress in some areas while others were still dealing with delays caused by the excessive soil moisture. Overall, soil moisture ratings were reported at 1% very short, 3% short, 78% adequate, and 18% surplus. There was an average of 5.4 days were suitable for fieldwork across South Carolina.




    FIELD CROPS

    Eighty-one percent of the CORN had silked by the end of the week, compared to last year’s 92% and the five-year average of 90%. The crop maintained an overall condition rating of mostly good. COTTON planting inched closer to completion, with 97% of the acreage planted by the end of the week. Producers were able to make substantial progress with OAT harvest and were 93% complete; however, this is still lagging behind last year’s and the five-year averages of 99% each.

    Twenty-one percent of the PEANUTS crop was pegged by the end of the week, compare to 31% last year and the 5-year average of 32%. Many producers were able to make a huge dent in planting double cropped SOYBEANS behind their small grains. By the end of the week, 90% of the crop has been planted, compared to 96% for both last year and the 5-year average. Due to excessive amounts of rain in its growing area, the overall condition of the TOBACCO crop decline slightly from the previous week to 5% poor, 24% fair, 67% good, and 4% excellent.

    WINTER WHEAT harvest continued at a steady pace. The crop harvest was 75% complete by the end of the week compared to 97% for both last year and the five-year average.

    OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST

    VEGETABLE harvests continued at a steady pace; however progress for each of the commodities continued to lag well behind the previous year’s harvesting rates. No insect or disease issues were reported. The PEACH harvest was 38% complete, compared to 57% last year, and 40% for the five-year average. LIVESTOCK conditions for the week were 1% poor, 20% fair, 76% good, and 3% excellent. PASTURE conditions were 18% fair, 70% good, and 12% excellent.

    WEATHER

    Localized downpours were common during the last week of June 2013. Monday’s middle-of-the-day convection left 2.13 inches of rain at Jocassee Dam and 1.55 inches at Sandhill. Tuesday’s thunderstorm cloud tops reached an altitude of 60,000 feet. Winds gusted to 63 mph during a storm’s passing over the Savannah River Site. A “cloudburst” near Forest Acres produced 1.34 inches of rain during a 15 minute interval.

    The Marlboro County Jetport (KBBP) noted a thunderstorm-caused forty-minute temperature fall of 17 degrees between 1:55 p.m. (90 degrees) and 2:35 p.m. (73 degrees). Drenching rains brought 3.06 inches to Gallivants Ferry and 2.24 inches to Georgetown AP. Large hail fell over portions of Charleston County during the late afternoon hours on Wednesday. At 6:05 p.m., tennis ball sized-hail (2.5-inch diameter) was observed 2 miles southeast of the Shadowmoss community. Union and Hardeeville reached a high temperature of 93 degrees.

    Thursday was hot for inland locations while the coastal plain received more rain and hail-producing cells for Berkeley, Dorchester and Charleston counties. Bennettsville and Kingstree recorded 95 degrees. Surface winds on Friday shifted to the west. The mercury responded to the down-slope winds by climbing to 95 degrees at Clarks Hill and Columbia’s Hamilton-Owens AP.

    An isolated storm at the Spartanburg AP (KSPA) produced winds of 48 mph that caused hangar and aircraft damage. An EF0 rated tornado traveled a short distance near Socastee on Friday afternoon breaking windows and causing light exterior residential damage.

    Scattered thundershowers fell again on Saturday over the beaches. Sullivan’s Island received an even 3 inches. Although the daytime balance of sky cover favored the clouds, temperatures climbed into the humid upper 80’s. On Sunday morning, Pelion cooled to a refreshing 65 degrees. Thundershowers were observed throughout the state on Sunday and into the midnight hour.

    The statewide June 2013 rainfall range included 13.77 inches at Sullivan’s Island (their wettest June since 1962) and 3.42 inches at Newberry. The state average temperature for the seven-day period was near the long-term average.

    The highest official temperature reported was 96 degrees at Clarks Hill on June 27 and at Clemson AP on June 28. The lowest official temperature reported was 60 degrees at Long Creek on June 30. The heaviest official 24-hour rainfall reported was 4.44 inches at N Myrtle Beach AP ending at 7:00 a.m. on June 30. The state average rainfall for the seven-day period was 1.5 inches.

    SOIL: 4-inch depth soil temperature: Columbia 79 degrees, Charleston 83 degrees.
    RIVERS AND SURF: South Carolina river stages were near normal. Ocean water temperatures at Springmaid Pier Myrtle Beach were reported at 81 degrees.


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