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  1. Texas: Feed-Grain Marketing Workshop, Amarillo, Feb. 10-11

    February 10 @ 8:00 am - March 11 @ 5:00 pm
  2. Georgia: Ag Business Planning Workshop, Glennville, Feb. 11, 18

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  3. Ohio: Agronomy Workshops, Wooster, Feb. 15, 16

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  4. Louisiana: Irrigation Management Workshop, Marksville, Feb. 16-17

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  5. Tennessee: Irrigation Meeting, Somerville, Feb. 16

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  6. Tennessee: Cotton Focus Meeting, Jackson, Feb. 18

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  7. Illinois: Ag Tech Innovation Summit, Champaign, Feb. 18

    February 18 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  8. Texas: Oil, Gas Leasing Workshop, College Station, Feb. 22

    February 22 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  9. Georgia: Required Classroom Trainings for Auxin Herbicide Tolerant Crops

    February 22 @ 8:00 am - March 1 @ 5:00 pm
  10. Texas: Wild Pig Management Workshop, Burnet, Feb. 24

    February 24 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  11. Mississippi: Ag Waste Disposal Day, Charleston, Feb. 24

    February 24 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  12. Virginia: USDA Agricultural Outlook Forum, Arlington, Feb. 25-26

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - February 26 @ 5:00 pm
  13. Georgia: Pest Manager Training, Forsyth, Feb. 25

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  14. Tennessee: Winter Row Crop Marketing Meeting, Mason, Feb. 25

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  15. Texas: Rice Technical Working Group, Galveston, March 1-4

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  16. Texas: Rice Technical Working Group Conference, Galveston, March 1-4

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  17. Texas: Permian Basin Cotton Conference, Big Spring, March 1

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  18. Kentucky: IPM Training, Princeton, March 2

    March 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  19. Texas: Regional Sorghum Program, Plainview, March 3

    March 3 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  20. Indiana Small Farm Conference, Danville, March 4-5

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  21. Kansas: 103rd Annual Cattlemen’s Day, Manhattan, March 4

    March 4 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  22. Kentucky: Integrated Pest Management Training, Princeton, March 2

    March 6 @ 8:00 am
  23. Oklahoma: Irrigation Conference, Woodward, March 8

    March 8 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  24. Oklahoma: Pecan Management Course, Stillwater, March 8

    March 8 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  25. Missouri: Free Pesticide Collection Event, Portageville, March 12

    March 12 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  26. Florida: Carinata Summit, Quincy, March 15-16

    March 15 @ 8:00 am - March 16 @ 5:00 pm

 

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North Carolina: Flash Floods, Wet Conditions Delay Field Work – US-DA

Ernst Undesser
From USDA July 1, 2013

North Carolina: Flash Floods, Wet Conditions Delay Field Work – US-DA

Crop Progress and Condition for the Week Ending June 30, 2013.

GENERAL: There were 3.6 days suitable for field work for the week ending June 30th, in comparison to 4.5 days for the week ending June 23rd. Statewide soil moisture levels were rated at 2% short, 52% adequate and 46% surplus. Average temperatures were above normal for the week ranging from 68 to 81 degrees. Several areas of the state received over 2.0 inches of rain during the week with a few areas recording over 5.0 inches of rain.

Flash flooding occurred in some areas of the state and the wet conditions have delayed field work once again. Farmers will need several days of dry, warm weather before they can continue with field work. However most of the state is expected to receive additional precipitation during the upcoming week. Crop plantings continue to run behind last year estimates and the 5-year averages.

        
         

Producers were able to get in the field this week to spray, plant, etc., but were not able to harvest any hay. Pop up thunder showers in the county kept most hay from being put on the ground. Soybeans are weedier and uneven due to excess rain, but corn looks good.
–Dianne Davis – Rutherford County FSA

With the recent rains, fertilizers in crops are being leached out. Field work has been nearly impossible. Small grains are lodging before the farmers can get them harvested. Alfatoxins and mycotoxins in grains are beginning to be a problem because of excess moisture from rain. Late gardens are being planted while early gardens are beginning to be harvested. The pastures look great and cattle continue to graze with no deficit in pasture production.
–Joey Knight – Caswell County Extension

Corn is just starting to tassel, while late-planted fields are just reaching knee high. Wet fields curtailed field operations. Target spot is still a problem in tobacco, weather conditions and soil moisture slowed treatment. Some hay being harvested, but frequency of showers resulted in wet hay. Fescue pastures are holding out better than most years due to more moderate temperatures and rainfall.
–Paul Westfall – Granville County Extension

Frequent rain is helping the corn crop which is tasseling, but it is preventing the completion of wheat harvest and planting of soybeans. Cabbage and Irish potato harvest is well underway. Corn crop looks fantastic, except for where we had wind damage.
–Al Wood – Pasquotank County Extension

Near daily rainfall is delaying remaining wheat harvest. Tobacco sucker control applications are a challenge as well due to wet fields and afternoon storms. Tobacco producers becoming concerned nitrogen levels may have leached out due to rainfall. Some localized drowning. Many growers are considering making nitrogen leaching adjustments. Corn, sorghum and soybeans look good.
–Mark Keene – Lenoir County Extension

Wet field conditions continue to delay wheat harvest as grain quality is deteriorating. Some growers still have close to half of their crop in the field. Major concerns about planting dates of double cropped soybeans behind wheat. Tobacco and cotton crop suffered severely from excess rain. Some reports in the county of 15″ of rain during June. Corn crop looks promising.
–Mac Malloy – Robeson County Extension

Ernst Undesser
From USDA July 1, 2013