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Texas: Cotton Received Some Much Needed Moisture

AaronT
From Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Lubbock June 21, 2013 15:30

Recent storms have provided much needed moisture across much of the High Plains and parts of the Panhandle. Unfortunately, these storms also brought hail and high winds that have caused varying levels of damage to already delayed cotton crops. Some fields were completely destroyed in the areas where large amounts of hail and/or high winds were observed.

        
         

Currently, there is no hard number to report in terms of lost cotton crops. Reports from Texas A&M AgriLife County Extension Ag Agents and IPM Agents indicate that some fields have already been replanted to cotton or sorghum.

Rainfall amounts reported by the Texas Tech University West Texas Mesonet System (Current and Past Precipitation) vary greatly thus far for the month of June and range from a high of 5.13” to a low of 0.93” for Anton and Friona, respectively.

These amounts have provided enough moisture to germinate cotton planted to dryland production fields in some areas but more is needed at timely intervals to maintain established stands.

Based on data from the CottonHeatUnits.com website, heat unit accumulations at Lubbock total 699 DD60s, which is 95 above our long term average of 604. In general, the cotton stands that have been established and managed to dodge the weather bullet appear to be in fair to good condition.

Growth stages of these crops range from just emerged or emerging to very early squaring. During my travels to the eastern part of the region earlier last week I determined that two dryland variety trial locations we planted had received some moisture following dry planting and were beginning to emerge.

With high temperatures forecast in the 90s for the next ten days and only slight chances for additional rainfall, cotton crops that have begun squaring should be watched closely for moisture stress, especially in areas where little rainfall was experienced during the recent storm events.

AaronT
From Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Lubbock June 21, 2013 15:30