The Latest

Events

  1. Oklahoma: Canola Schools – August 2 and 4

    July 20 @ 5:00 am - August 5 @ 1:00 am
  2. InfoAg Conference, St. Louis, Aug. 2-4

    August 2 @ 8:00 am - August 4 @ 5:00 pm
  3. Tennessee: Mid-South Ag Finance Conference, Martin, Aug. 3

    August 3 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  4. Arkansas: RiceTec Field Day, Harrisburg, Aug. 3

    August 3 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  5. New Mexico: Ag Science Center Field Day, Clovis, Aug. 3

    August 3 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  6. Texas: Cotton Fiber Quality Conference, Lubbock, Aug. 4

    August 4 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  7. Arkansas Rice Expo, Stuttgart, Aug. 10

    August 10 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  8. North Mississippi Row Crops Field Day, Verona, Aug. 11

    August 11 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  9. Texas: Small Grain Workshop, Brownwood, Aug. 11

    August 11 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  10. Texas: Pre-Plant Wheat Meeting, Amarillo, Aug. 12

    August 12 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  11. Kansas: Farm Succession Planning Seminar, Jewell, Aug. 16

    August 16 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  12. Illinois: Agronomy Day, Savoy, August 18

    August 18 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  13. Kansas: Farm Risk and Profit Conference, Manhattan, Aug. 18-19

    August 18 @ 8:00 am - August 19 @ 5:00 pm
  14. Kansas: Water Management Field Day, Colby, Aug. 23

    August 23 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  15. Georgia: Pest Manager Training Workshop, Savannah, Aug. 26

    August 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  16. Louisiana: Sweet Potato Field Day, Chase, Aug. 31

    August 31 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  17. Georgia Peanut Tour, Tifton, Sept. 13-15

    September 13 @ 8:00 am - September 15 @ 5:00 pm
  18. California Almond Conference, Sacramento, Dec. 6-8

    December 6 @ 8:00 am - December 8 @ 5:00 pm

Nebraska: Options for Planting Forages after Wheat

Mike Christensen
By Bruce Anderson, University of Nebraska June 14, 2013

With wheat harvest quickly approaching, this is a good time to make plans for what you’ll do with those fields post-harvest.

Planting a forage into wheat stubble for hay, silage, or grazing is an especially valuable option this year as growers try to rebuild feed reserves that were exhausted last spring due to drought or slow early season growth.

If you’re considering a forage, be aware that seed supplies for traditional favorites may be short. Cover crops last fall, spring forage plantings, and now prevented planting choices in some states have used most of the forage seed, making this a good year to try something new.

 

Typically, we might plant an early maturing corn or a forage sorghum to chop for silage. If these seeds aren’t available, maybe a short-season sunflower will work for silage. Sunflower survives light frost and yields well under many conditions.

For double-crop hay, sorghum-sudan hybrids, pearl millet, or foxtail millet tend to be first choices. A good alternative is solid-seeded soybeans. Also consider planting bin-run corn very thick so stems aren’t so heavy and hard to cut and dry. Oats or other spring small grains planted in early August are another option.

Definitely consider turnips and other brassicas, as well as oats, for fall pasture planted into wheat stubble in late July or early August. Often they are less expensive to plant and, with a few timely rains, will produce a good amount of high quality feed in a short time.

Mike Christensen
By Bruce Anderson, University of Nebraska June 14, 2013