The Latest

Events

  1. Illinois: Crop Management Conferences, Jan. 20 – Feb. 10

    January 20 @ 8:00 am - February 10 @ 8:00 am
  2. Ohio: Corn College Workshop, Greenville, Feb. 10

    February 10 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  3. Arkansas State Agribusiness Conference, Jonesboro, Feb. 10

    February 10 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  4. Texas: Feed-Grain Marketing Workshop, Amarillo, Feb. 10-11

    February 10 @ 8:00 am - March 11 @ 5:00 pm
  5. West Florida Crops Meeting, Jay, February 11

    February 11 @ 7:45 am - 12:00 pm
  6. Georgia: Ag Business Planning Workshop, Glennville, Feb. 11, 18

    February 11 @ 8:00 am - February 18 @ 5:00 pm
  7. Alabama-Florida Peanut Trade Show, Dothan, February 11

    February 11 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  8. Four States Agricultural Exposition, Texarkana, Feb. 11

    February 11 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  9. Ohio: Agronomy Workshops, Wooster, Feb. 15, 16

    February 15 @ 8:00 am - February 16 @ 8:00 am
  10. Louisiana: Irrigation Management Workshop, Marksville, Feb. 16-17

    February 16 @ 8:00 am - February 17 @ 8:00 am
  11. Tennessee: Irrigation Meeting, Somerville, Feb. 16

    February 16 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  12. Tennessee: Cotton Focus Meeting, Jackson, Feb. 18

    February 18 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  13. Illinois: Ag Tech Innovation Summit, Champaign, Feb. 18

    February 18 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  14. Texas: Oil, Gas Leasing Workshop, College Station, Feb. 22

    February 22 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  15. Georgia: Auxin Herbicide Training, Alma, Feb. 22

    February 22 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  16. Texas: Wild Pig Management Workshop, Burnet, Feb. 24

    February 24 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  17. Mississippi: Ag Waste Disposal Day, Charleston, Feb. 24

    February 24 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  18. Virginia: USDA Agricultural Outlook Forum, Arlington, Feb. 25-26

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - February 26 @ 5:00 pm
  19. Georgia: Pest Manager Training, Forsyth, Feb. 25

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  20. Tennessee: Winter Row Crop Marketing Meeting, Mason, Feb. 25

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  21. Texas: Rice Technical Working Group, Galveston, March 1-4

    March 1 @ 8:00 am - March 4 @ 8:00 am
  22. Texas: Rice Technical Working Group Conference, Galveston, March 1-4

    March 1 @ 8:00 am - March 4 @ 5:00 pm
  23. Texas: Regional Sorghum Program, Plainview, March 3

    March 3 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  24. Indiana Small Farm Conference, Danville, March 4-5

    March 4 @ 8:00 am - March 5 @ 5:00 pm
  25. Kansas: 103rd Annual Cattlemen’s Day, Manhattan, March 4

    March 4 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  26. Kentucky: Integrated Pest Management Training, Princeton, March 2

    March 6 @ 8:00 am
  27. Oklahoma: Irrigation Conference, Woodward, March 8

    March 8 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  28. Oklahoma: Pecan Management Course, Stillwater, March 8

    March 8 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  29. Missouri: Free Pesticide Collection Event, Portageville, March 12

    March 12 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  30. Florida: Carinata Summit, Quincy, March 15-16

    March 15 @ 8:00 am - March 16 @ 5:00 pm

 

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Virginia Cotton: Characteristics of Cool Planting Dates

Ernst Undesser
By Johnny Parker, Commonwealth Gin May 15, 2013

Virginia Cotton: Characteristics of Cool Planting Dates

The best planting conditions for cotton that we have seen all season are now here.  The cotton we are planting now is going to explode out of the ground and look very uniform and healthy. 

So what about the early planted cotton this year?  There is no question that we have had good success from planting cotton in some borderline cool conditions here in Virginia over the years.  In fact I can only remember one or two years were we did not have to stop for a few days and wait for the cool weather to go through. 

Nevertheless, I am pretty sure this is the first time we have had frost on the hot tub cover in the middle of May.  The one characteristic I expect a lot of the cotton that has been planted up until now to have is sporadic plant emergence. 

It seems to me that the biological variability within each seed is amplified by cold nights such that the most vigorous seed will emerge almost like it was warm.  The weaker seed will still eventually sprout and develop only at a slower pace that will last even though bloom evidenced by delayed blooming from these plants. 

When we get a lot of packing rain or in hard spots in the field, we will see some poor stands more often than when planting in warm conditions depending on the percentage of low cool germ seed in the bag and the coolness of the ground.  While the uniformity may be variable, timely rainfall during bloom will still produce top yields.

Commonwealth Gin

Ernst Undesser
By Johnny Parker, Commonwealth Gin May 15, 2013