The Latest

Events

  1. Texas: Feed-Grain Marketing Workshop, Amarillo, Feb. 10-11

    February 10 @ 8:00 am - March 11 @ 5:00 pm
  2. Georgia: Ag Business Planning Workshop, Glennville, Feb. 11, 18

    February 11 @ 8:00 am - February 18 @ 5:00 pm
  3. Ohio: Agronomy Workshops, Wooster, Feb. 15, 16

    February 15 @ 8:00 am - February 16 @ 8:00 am
  4. Louisiana: Irrigation Management Workshop, Marksville, Feb. 16-17

    February 16 @ 8:00 am - February 17 @ 8:00 am
  5. Tennessee: Irrigation Meeting, Somerville, Feb. 16

    February 16 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  6. Tennessee: Cotton Focus Meeting, Jackson, Feb. 18

    February 18 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  7. Illinois: Ag Tech Innovation Summit, Champaign, Feb. 18

    February 18 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  8. Texas: Oil, Gas Leasing Workshop, College Station, Feb. 22

    February 22 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  9. Georgia: Required Classroom Trainings for Auxin Herbicide Tolerant Crops

    February 22 @ 8:00 am - March 1 @ 5:00 pm
  10. Arkansas: 6 Spray Clinics in Feb, March

    February 23 @ 8:00 am - March 10 @ 5:00 pm
  11. Texas: Wild Pig Management Workshop, Burnet, Feb. 24

    February 24 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  12. Mississippi: Ag Waste Disposal Day, Charleston, Feb. 24

    February 24 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  13. Virginia: USDA Agricultural Outlook Forum, Arlington, Feb. 25-26

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - February 26 @ 5:00 pm
  14. Georgia: Pest Manager Training, Forsyth, Feb. 25

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  15. Tennessee: Winter Row Crop Marketing Meeting, Mason, Feb. 25

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  16. Louisiana: Rice Producer Meeting, Crowley, Feb. 26

    February 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  17. Texas: Rice Technical Working Group, Galveston, March 1-4

    March 1 @ 8:00 am - March 4 @ 8:00 am
  18. Texas: Rice Technical Working Group Conference, Galveston, March 1-4

    March 1 @ 8:00 am - March 4 @ 5:00 pm
  19. Texas: Permian Basin Cotton Conference, Big Spring, March 1

    March 1 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  20. Kentucky: IPM Training, Princeton, March 2

    March 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  21. Texas: Regional Sorghum Program, Plainview, March 3

    March 3 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  22. Indiana Small Farm Conference, Danville, March 4-5

    March 4 @ 8:00 am - March 5 @ 5:00 pm
  23. Kansas: 103rd Annual Cattlemen’s Day, Manhattan, March 4

    March 4 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  24. Kentucky: Integrated Pest Management Training, Princeton, March 2

    March 6 @ 8:00 am
  25. Oklahoma: Irrigation Conference, Woodward, March 8

    March 8 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  26. Oklahoma: Pecan Management Course, Stillwater, March 8

    March 8 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  27. Georgia: Pest Manager Training, Gainesville, March 10

    March 10 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  28. Missouri: Free Pesticide Collection Event, Portageville, March 12

    March 12 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  29. Florida: Carinata Summit, Quincy, March 15-16

    March 15 @ 8:00 am - March 16 @ 5:00 pm

 

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North Carolina: Soybean Rust Confirmed In State, First Time For 2012

Owen Taylor
By Jim Dunphy, Extension Soybean Specialist, and Steve Koenning, Extension Plant Pathologist, North Carolina State University September 11, 2012

North Carolina: Soybean Rust Confirmed In State, First Time For 2012

Soybean rust was detected in soybean in Robeson County near St. Pauls, North Carolina, today.

This is the earliest that soybean rust has been detected in North Carolina.  Rust was identified on one of four leaves brought to the lab. The earliest detection of soybean rust in North Carolina in previous years was September 15th in 2007.

Soybeans that have just reached full bloom (stage R2) typically have 65 days until they’re safe from rust or frost (stage R7) if they are full-season soybeans, or closer to 55 days if they are double-crop soybeans.  If they have small pods in the top of the plants (stage R3), they have 55 and 47 days, respectively, to R7.

With full sized pods in the top of the plants (stage R4), they have 45 and 38 days, respectively, until R7.  From stage R5 (small seeds in the top of the plant) they typically have 35 and 30 days, respectively.

From stage R6 (full sized seeds in the top of the plants), they typically have 20 and 17 days, respectively.

Rust will typically take 10-20 days from initial infection to develop to detectable levels.  It will take another 7-14 days to spread to other leaves on the same plant, and another 10 days to cause significant defoliation.  This assumes optimal conditions for rust “65-85 degrees, and either overcast or rainfall through much of this period.

This is not common in North Carolina in September and October but has and can occur.

Owen Taylor
By Jim Dunphy, Extension Soybean Specialist, and Steve Koenning, Extension Plant Pathologist, North Carolina State University September 11, 2012