The Latest

Events

  1. Illinois: Crop Management Conferences, Jan. 20 – Feb. 10

    January 20 @ 8:00 am - February 10 @ 8:00 am
  2. Ohio: Corn College Workshop, Greenville, Feb. 10

    February 10 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  3. Arkansas State Agribusiness Conference, Jonesboro, Feb. 10

    February 10 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  4. Texas: Feed-Grain Marketing Workshop, Amarillo, Feb. 10-11

    February 10 @ 8:00 am - March 11 @ 5:00 pm
  5. West Florida Crops Meeting, Jay, February 11

    February 11 @ 7:45 am - 12:00 pm
  6. Georgia: Ag Business Planning Workshop, Glennville, Feb. 11, 18

    February 11 @ 8:00 am - February 18 @ 5:00 pm
  7. Alabama-Florida Peanut Trade Show, Dothan, February 11

    February 11 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  8. Four States Agricultural Exposition, Texarkana, Feb. 11

    February 11 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  9. Ohio: Agronomy Workshops, Wooster, Feb. 15, 16

    February 15 @ 8:00 am - February 16 @ 8:00 am
  10. Louisiana: Irrigation Management Workshop, Marksville, Feb. 16-17

    February 16 @ 8:00 am - February 17 @ 8:00 am
  11. Tennessee: Irrigation Meeting, Somerville, Feb. 16

    February 16 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  12. Tennessee: Cotton Focus Meeting, Jackson, Feb. 18

    February 18 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  13. Illinois: Ag Tech Innovation Summit, Champaign, Feb. 18

    February 18 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  14. Texas: Oil, Gas Leasing Workshop, College Station, Feb. 22

    February 22 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  15. Georgia: Auxin Herbicide Training, Alma, Feb. 22

    February 22 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  16. Texas: Wild Pig Management Workshop, Burnet, Feb. 24

    February 24 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  17. Mississippi: Ag Waste Disposal Day, Charleston, Feb. 24

    February 24 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  18. Virginia: USDA Agricultural Outlook Forum, Arlington, Feb. 25-26

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - February 26 @ 5:00 pm
  19. Georgia: Pest Manager Training, Forsyth, Feb. 25

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  20. Tennessee: Winter Row Crop Marketing Meeting, Mason, Feb. 25

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  21. Texas: Rice Technical Working Group, Galveston, March 1-4

    March 1 @ 8:00 am - March 4 @ 8:00 am
  22. Texas: Rice Technical Working Group Conference, Galveston, March 1-4

    March 1 @ 8:00 am - March 4 @ 5:00 pm
  23. Texas: Regional Sorghum Program, Plainview, March 3

    March 3 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  24. Indiana Small Farm Conference, Danville, March 4-5

    March 4 @ 8:00 am - March 5 @ 5:00 pm
  25. Kansas: 103rd Annual Cattlemen’s Day, Manhattan, March 4

    March 4 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  26. Kentucky: Integrated Pest Management Training, Princeton, March 2

    March 6 @ 8:00 am
  27. Oklahoma: Irrigation Conference, Woodward, March 8

    March 8 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  28. Oklahoma: Pecan Management Course, Stillwater, March 8

    March 8 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  29. Missouri: Free Pesticide Collection Event, Portageville, March 12

    March 12 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  30. Florida: Carinata Summit, Quincy, March 15-16

    March 15 @ 8:00 am - March 16 @ 5:00 pm

 

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Louisiana: Restocking Crawfish in Permanent Ponds a Waste

Mike Christensen
By Bruce Schultz, Louisiana State University May 16, 2012

Louisiana rice farmers who plan to harvest crawfish from their fields next year should consider restocking crawfish once their rice crops have been flooded.

But restocking permanent ponds is seldom anything but a waste of time and money, according to LSU AgCenter crawfish researcher Ray McClain.

The only time restocking is justifiable in a permanent pond is with a newly constructed pond or in an existing one that has been affected by a catastrophe, McClain said.

“Under normal circumstances, if there’s enough crawfish to harvest, there’s enough crawfish for a brood stock,” he said.

        
         

Trapping crawfish is so inefficient it will not deplete enough crawfish to affect the next year’s production.

McClain said restocking crawfish in rice fields that are in a crawfish-rice rotation should be done before June when water becomes hot.

Several points that should be remembered when stocking, McClain said, include:

– Start with healthy crawfish.

– Stock with an equal number of males and females.

– Handle stockers with more care than crawfish to be eaten. “You want to get them in the water as soon as possible, and you don’t want crawfish that are kept in a cooler.”

– Size is not important because it generally is determined by environmental factors. Smaller to mid-size crawfish will provide a similar number of young, while size at harvest will be determined primarily by environmental conditions and not by size of brood stock.

– Where the crawfish are harvested isn’t important, as long as they are healthy.

– Consider getting stockers from different sources to diversify the population.

– Spread stocking out over several days at the rate of one to two 34- to 40-pound sacks per day.

Generally, McClain said, stocking is a good idea when rice is six to eight weeks old, the permanent flood has been established and the rice is beyond the need for insecticides.

Mike Christensen
By Bruce Schultz, Louisiana State University May 16, 2012