The Latest

Events

  1. Texas: Feed-Grain Marketing Workshop, Amarillo, Feb. 10-11

    February 10 @ 8:00 am - March 11 @ 5:00 pm
  2. Georgia: Ag Business Planning Workshop, Glennville, Feb. 11, 18

    February 11 @ 8:00 am - February 18 @ 5:00 pm
  3. Ohio: Agronomy Workshops, Wooster, Feb. 15, 16

    February 15 @ 8:00 am - February 16 @ 8:00 am
  4. Louisiana: Irrigation Management Workshop, Marksville, Feb. 16-17

    February 16 @ 8:00 am - February 17 @ 8:00 am
  5. Tennessee: Irrigation Meeting, Somerville, Feb. 16

    February 16 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  6. Tennessee: Cotton Focus Meeting, Jackson, Feb. 18

    February 18 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  7. Illinois: Ag Tech Innovation Summit, Champaign, Feb. 18

    February 18 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  8. Texas: Oil, Gas Leasing Workshop, College Station, Feb. 22

    February 22 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  9. Georgia: Required Classroom Trainings for Auxin Herbicide Tolerant Crops

    February 22 @ 8:00 am - March 1 @ 5:00 pm
  10. Arkansas: 6 Spray Clinics in Feb, March

    February 23 @ 8:00 am - March 10 @ 5:00 pm
  11. Texas: Wild Pig Management Workshop, Burnet, Feb. 24

    February 24 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  12. Mississippi: Ag Waste Disposal Day, Charleston, Feb. 24

    February 24 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  13. Virginia: USDA Agricultural Outlook Forum, Arlington, Feb. 25-26

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - February 26 @ 5:00 pm
  14. Georgia: Pest Manager Training, Forsyth, Feb. 25

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  15. Tennessee: Winter Row Crop Marketing Meeting, Mason, Feb. 25

    February 25 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  16. Louisiana: Rice Producer Meeting, Crowley, Feb. 26

    February 26 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  17. Texas: Rice Technical Working Group, Galveston, March 1-4

    March 1 @ 8:00 am - March 4 @ 8:00 am
  18. Texas: Rice Technical Working Group Conference, Galveston, March 1-4

    March 1 @ 8:00 am - March 4 @ 5:00 pm
  19. Texas: Permian Basin Cotton Conference, Big Spring, March 1

    March 1 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  20. Kentucky: IPM Training, Princeton, March 2

    March 2 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  21. Texas: Regional Sorghum Program, Plainview, March 3

    March 3 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  22. Indiana Small Farm Conference, Danville, March 4-5

    March 4 @ 8:00 am - March 5 @ 5:00 pm
  23. Kansas: 103rd Annual Cattlemen’s Day, Manhattan, March 4

    March 4 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  24. Kentucky: Integrated Pest Management Training, Princeton, March 2

    March 6 @ 8:00 am
  25. Oklahoma: Irrigation Conference, Woodward, March 8

    March 8 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  26. Oklahoma: Pecan Management Course, Stillwater, March 8

    March 8 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  27. Georgia: Pest Manager Training, Gainesville, March 10

    March 10 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  28. Missouri: Free Pesticide Collection Event, Portageville, March 12

    March 12 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
  29. Florida: Carinata Summit, Quincy, March 15-16

    March 15 @ 8:00 am - March 16 @ 5:00 pm

 

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K-State Scientists Provide Bt Corn Tips

Mike Christensen
From Kansas State University November 23, 2011

There’s a long, cold winter between now and the 2012 planting season, but corn growers are already planning for spring. Kansas State University scientists encourage producers to keep some things in mind as they consider corn hybrids.

“Since Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) corn first came on the market several years ago, there have been many changes,” said K-State Research and Extension agronomist Kraig Roozeboom. “Now there are several different Bt products on the market, and various versions with different traits.”

Roozeboom, along with K-State entomologist Jeff Whitworth, gave tips for corn growers regarding Bt corn selection.

•       Avoid using hybrids with traits that are not necessary. Using such hybrids will increase the chances of insects developing resistance to the traits. For example, producers who are not in a continuous corn system probably do not need corn rootworm Bt hybrids.

•       Consider rotating hybrids with different Bt proteins (events) for a given insect. Much like rotating different classes of insecticides, it doesn’t hurt to use hybrids with different events and different modes of action for a specific pest. For example, the Agrisure, Herculex/Optimum and YieldGard/Genuity hybrids use different events. This may help delay resistance. It’s also important to pay attention to whether an insect is controlled or suppressed in a hybrid.

•       Follow refuge requirements for the various traits and trait stacks as applicable to their location. Their seed suppliers should provide that information as part of the grower agreement.

More information, including charts showing genes, events, and insects controlled by each of the different products, is available in the Nov. 11, 2011 extension agronomy e-Update newsletter: http://www.agronomy.ksu.edu/extension/p.aspx?tabid=58.

Mike Christensen
From Kansas State University November 23, 2011